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Article: Time-activity relationships to VOC personal exposure factors

TitleTime-activity relationships to VOC personal exposure factors
Authors
KeywordsDeterminants Of Exposure
Population Subgroups.
Socio-Demographic Factors
Time-Activity Patterns
Volatile Organic Compounds
Issue Date2006
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenv
Citation
Atmospheric Environment, 2006, v. 40 n. 29, p. 5685-5700 How to Cite?
AbstractSocial and demographic factors have been found to play a significant role in differences between time-activity patterns of population subgroups. Since time-activity patterns largely influence personal exposure to compounds as individuals move across microenvironments, exposure subgroups within the population may be defined by factors that influence daily activity patterns. Socio-demographic and environmental factors that define time-activity subgroups also define quantifiable differences in VOC personal exposures to different sources and individual compounds in the Expolis study. Significant differences in exposures to traffic-related compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were observed in relation to gender, number of children and living alone. Categorization of exposures further indicated time exposed to traffic at work and time in a car as important determinants. Increased exposures to decane, nonane and undecane were observed for males, housewives and self-employed. Categorization of exposures indicated exposure subgroups related to workshop use and living downtown. Higher exposures to 3-carene and α-pinene commonly found in household cleaning products and fragrances were associated with more children, while exposures to traffic compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were reduced with more children. Considerable unexplained variation remained in categorization of exposures associated with home product use and fragrances, due to individual behavior and product choice. More targeted data collection methods in VOC exposure studies for these sources should be used. Living alone was associated with decreased exposures to 2-methyl-1-propanol and 1-butanol, and traffic-related compounds. Identification of these subgroups may help to reduce the large amount of unexplained variation in VOC exposure studies. Further they may help in assessing impacts of urban planning that result in changes in behavior of individuals, resulting in shifts in the patterns of exposure experienced by the population. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151627
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.459
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.999
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchweizer, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLlacqua, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorJantunen, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorBayerOglesby, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorKünzli, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:25:39Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:25:39Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Environment, 2006, v. 40 n. 29, p. 5685-5700en_US
dc.identifier.issn1352-2310en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151627-
dc.description.abstractSocial and demographic factors have been found to play a significant role in differences between time-activity patterns of population subgroups. Since time-activity patterns largely influence personal exposure to compounds as individuals move across microenvironments, exposure subgroups within the population may be defined by factors that influence daily activity patterns. Socio-demographic and environmental factors that define time-activity subgroups also define quantifiable differences in VOC personal exposures to different sources and individual compounds in the Expolis study. Significant differences in exposures to traffic-related compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were observed in relation to gender, number of children and living alone. Categorization of exposures further indicated time exposed to traffic at work and time in a car as important determinants. Increased exposures to decane, nonane and undecane were observed for males, housewives and self-employed. Categorization of exposures indicated exposure subgroups related to workshop use and living downtown. Higher exposures to 3-carene and α-pinene commonly found in household cleaning products and fragrances were associated with more children, while exposures to traffic compounds ethylbenzene, m- and p-xylene and o-xylene were reduced with more children. Considerable unexplained variation remained in categorization of exposures associated with home product use and fragrances, due to individual behavior and product choice. More targeted data collection methods in VOC exposure studies for these sources should be used. Living alone was associated with decreased exposures to 2-methyl-1-propanol and 1-butanol, and traffic-related compounds. Identification of these subgroups may help to reduce the large amount of unexplained variation in VOC exposure studies. Further they may help in assessing impacts of urban planning that result in changes in behavior of individuals, resulting in shifts in the patterns of exposure experienced by the population. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenven_US
dc.relation.ispartofAtmospheric Environmenten_US
dc.subjectDeterminants Of Exposureen_US
dc.subjectPopulation Subgroups.en_US
dc.subjectSocio-Demographic Factorsen_US
dc.subjectTime-Activity Patternsen_US
dc.subjectVolatile Organic Compoundsen_US
dc.titleTime-activity relationships to VOC personal exposure factorsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, HK:laihk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, HK=rp01527en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atmosenv.2006.04.057en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747069095en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33747069095&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume40en_US
dc.identifier.issue29en_US
dc.identifier.spage5685en_US
dc.identifier.epage5700en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240524600014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEdwards, RD=7403978901en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchweizer, C=8404193500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLlacqua, V=14063588600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, HK=11739685900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJantunen, M=26643559000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBayerOglesby, L=6507948222en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKünzli, N=7006806977en_US

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