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Article: Do doctors act on their self-reported intention to computerize? A follow-up population-based survey in Hong Kong

TitleDo doctors act on their self-reported intention to computerize? A follow-up population-based survey in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsComputerization
Follow-up
Intention to computerize
Physician
Physicians
Predictors of computerisation
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijmedinf
Citation
International Journal Of Medical Informatics, 2004, v. 73 n. 5, p. 415-431 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and objectives: We performed a follow-up survey to document changes in the level of computerization among physicians in Hong Kong between 2000 and 2001, specifically examining whether their self-reported intention to computerize various clinical or administrative tasks actually translated into computerization of these tasks 1 year later. Determining such a relationship will indicate the reliability, and thus the utility of questions regarding self-reported intention to computerize clinical practice. Methods: A self-completed follow-up postal questionnaire was sent to all 949 physicians who responded to the original questionnaire. Pairwise repeated dichotomous responses from 2000 and 2001 on the computerization of specific functions were compared using McNemar test. Wilcoxon sign-ranked test was employed to compare the total number of tasks computerized in the 2 years. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was carried out to determine predictors for the translation of intention to computerize into actual computerization. Results: The response rate was 77.0%. There was a significant increase in the number of tasks computerized for both "corporate" and "individual" practices between 2000 and 2001. The proportion of physicians who intended to computerize and actually computerized ranged from 7.7 to 51.0% for different tasks. For five clinical tasks, more than 50% respondents in corporate practices translated the intention to implementation, compared to fewer than 20% in individual practices. Predictors found to be associated with the translation of intention to computerize into actual computerization included higher number of tasks intended to computerize, higher number of tasks already computerized, and more positive physicians' attitudes on the impact of computerization to clinical practice. Conclusions: We conclude that physicians' self-reported intention to computerize the clinical practice 12 months previously was moderately associated with actual implementation, with varying degrees of concordance for different clinical and administrative tasks. The identified predictors for the translation of intention to actual computerization may be useful in targeting specific strategies to promote computerization of clinical practice. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151613
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.363
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.405
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLai, TYYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, IOLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:25:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:25:28Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Medical Informatics, 2004, v. 73 n. 5, p. 415-431en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1386-5056en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151613-
dc.description.abstractBackground and objectives: We performed a follow-up survey to document changes in the level of computerization among physicians in Hong Kong between 2000 and 2001, specifically examining whether their self-reported intention to computerize various clinical or administrative tasks actually translated into computerization of these tasks 1 year later. Determining such a relationship will indicate the reliability, and thus the utility of questions regarding self-reported intention to computerize clinical practice. Methods: A self-completed follow-up postal questionnaire was sent to all 949 physicians who responded to the original questionnaire. Pairwise repeated dichotomous responses from 2000 and 2001 on the computerization of specific functions were compared using McNemar test. Wilcoxon sign-ranked test was employed to compare the total number of tasks computerized in the 2 years. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was carried out to determine predictors for the translation of intention to computerize into actual computerization. Results: The response rate was 77.0%. There was a significant increase in the number of tasks computerized for both "corporate" and "individual" practices between 2000 and 2001. The proportion of physicians who intended to computerize and actually computerized ranged from 7.7 to 51.0% for different tasks. For five clinical tasks, more than 50% respondents in corporate practices translated the intention to implementation, compared to fewer than 20% in individual practices. Predictors found to be associated with the translation of intention to computerize into actual computerization included higher number of tasks intended to computerize, higher number of tasks already computerized, and more positive physicians' attitudes on the impact of computerization to clinical practice. Conclusions: We conclude that physicians' self-reported intention to computerize the clinical practice 12 months previously was moderately associated with actual implementation, with varying degrees of concordance for different clinical and administrative tasks. The identified predictors for the translation of intention to actual computerization may be useful in targeting specific strategies to promote computerization of clinical practice. © 2004 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ijmedinfen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Medical Informaticsen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Medical Informatics. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.-
dc.subjectComputerizationen_HK
dc.subjectFollow-upen_HK
dc.subjectIntention to computerizeen_HK
dc.subjectPhysicianen_HK
dc.subjectPhysiciansen_HK
dc.subjectPredictors of computerisationen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude Of Health Personnelen_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude To Computersen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInformation Systemsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshOrganizational Innovationen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.titleDo doctors act on their self-reported intention to computerize? A follow-up population-based survey in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM: gmleung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, IOL: iolwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM: jjohnsto@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, IOL=rp01806en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2004.03.004en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15171983-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2542471334en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87817-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2542471334&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume73en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage415en_HK
dc.identifier.epage431en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222130300002-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, TYY=24450817900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, IOL=7102513940en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_HK

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