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Article: Health consequences of breast-feeding: Doctors' visits and hospitalizations during the first 18 months of life in Hong Kong Chinese infants

TitleHealth consequences of breast-feeding: Doctors' visits and hospitalizations during the first 18 months of life in Hong Kong Chinese infants
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.com
Citation
Epidemiology, 2005, v. 16 n. 3, p. 328-335 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The evidence on whether breast-feeding reduces health services use in nonwhite infants is scant. We examined the effects of breast-feeding on health services utilization in Hong Kong Chinese infants. Methods: We followed a population-based cohort of 8327 infants born in 1997 for 18 months. The main outcome measures were higher (above the sample mean) utilization of outpatient visits and hospitalizations for jaundice, gastrointestinal or respiratory/febrile illnesses, and all illnesses. Results: Breast-fed infants had fewer illness-related doctor visits overall through the first 18 months of life. Results were strongest for infants breast fed exclusively for 2 to 3 months (odds ratio [OR] for higher utilization = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.62-0.99) and for 4 or more months (0.65; 0.53-0.81). However, breast-fed infants were more likely to receive outpatient care for jaundice, particularly in the first 3 months of life (ORs ranging from 2.5 to 8.4). Any breast-feeding was also associated with more jaundice-related hospital admissions, the effects of which were most acute in the first 3 months of life. Compared with exclusively formula-fed infants, the OR (CI) for mixed breast- and formula-fed was 2.4 (1.7-3.5); for exclusive breast-feeding up to 1 month, 4.5 (2.7-7.6); for exclusive breast-feeding 2 to 3 months, 3.2 (1.8-5.7); and for exclusive breast-feeding 4 or more months, 3.4 (2.0-5.7). Conclusions: Breast-feeding in Hong Kong Chinese infants reduces doctor visits overall, but increases both outpatient visits and hospitalizations for jaundice. Copyright © 2005 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151599
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.075
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.981
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLam, THen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:25:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:25:18Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEpidemiology, 2005, v. 16 n. 3, p. 328-335en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1044-3983en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151599-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The evidence on whether breast-feeding reduces health services use in nonwhite infants is scant. We examined the effects of breast-feeding on health services utilization in Hong Kong Chinese infants. Methods: We followed a population-based cohort of 8327 infants born in 1997 for 18 months. The main outcome measures were higher (above the sample mean) utilization of outpatient visits and hospitalizations for jaundice, gastrointestinal or respiratory/febrile illnesses, and all illnesses. Results: Breast-fed infants had fewer illness-related doctor visits overall through the first 18 months of life. Results were strongest for infants breast fed exclusively for 2 to 3 months (odds ratio [OR] for higher utilization = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.62-0.99) and for 4 or more months (0.65; 0.53-0.81). However, breast-fed infants were more likely to receive outpatient care for jaundice, particularly in the first 3 months of life (ORs ranging from 2.5 to 8.4). Any breast-feeding was also associated with more jaundice-related hospital admissions, the effects of which were most acute in the first 3 months of life. Compared with exclusively formula-fed infants, the OR (CI) for mixed breast- and formula-fed was 2.4 (1.7-3.5); for exclusive breast-feeding up to 1 month, 4.5 (2.7-7.6); for exclusive breast-feeding 2 to 3 months, 3.2 (1.8-5.7); and for exclusive breast-feeding 4 or more months, 3.4 (2.0-5.7). Conclusions: Breast-feeding in Hong Kong Chinese infants reduces doctor visits overall, but increases both outpatient visits and hospitalizations for jaundice. Copyright © 2005 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.epidem.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEpidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshBreast Feeding - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshChild Health Services - Utilizationen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshEducational Statusen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - Statistics & Numerical Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn, Diseases - Epidemiology - Prevention & Controlen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.titleHealth consequences of breast-feeding: Doctors' visits and hospitalizations during the first 18 months of life in Hong Kong Chinese infantsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH:hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM:lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL:lauylung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.ede.0000158740.30516.aeen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15824548-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-17844408481en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97717-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-17844408481&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume16en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage328en_HK
dc.identifier.epage335en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228568400010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, TH=7202522876en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK

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