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Article: Personal exposures to VOC in the upper end of the distribution - Relationships to indoor, outdoor and workplace concentrations

TitlePersonal exposures to VOC in the upper end of the distribution - Relationships to indoor, outdoor and workplace concentrations
Authors
KeywordsBenzene
Exposures
Hexane
Indoor Sources
Microenvironment Concentrations
Naphthalene
Volatile Organic Compounds
Issue Date2005
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenv
Citation
Atmospheric Environment, 2005, v. 39 n. 12, p. 2299-2307 How to Cite?
AbstractEvaluation of relationships between median residential indoor, indoor workplace and population exposures may obscure potential strategies for exposure reduction. Evaluation of participants with personal exposures above median levels in the EXPOLIS study in Athens, Helsinki, Oxford and Prague illustrated that these participants frequently showed a different relationship to indoor and workplace levels than that shown by the population median. Thus, prioritization of environments for control measures based on median exposures may exclude important areas where effectively focused control measures are possible, and may therefore have little impact on the highest and most harmful exposures. Further, personal exposures at the upper end of the distribution may exceed the US EPA inhalation reference concentration (Rfc), illustrated here using hexane, naphthalene and benzene. For example upper 90th percentile personal exposures to benzene in Athens and Prague were 64 and 27 μg m-3 with peak exposures of 217 and 38 μg m-3, respectively for non-ETS exposed participants relative to an Rfc of 30 μg m-3. Strategies to reduce exposures to individual compounds, therefore, may benefit from focus on the high end of the distribution to identify activities and behaviors that result in elevated exposures. Control strategies targeting activities that lead to exposures in the upper end of the distribution would reduce the variability associated with population median values by bringing the upper end of the exposure distribution closer to median values. Thus, compliance with health-based standards would be more protective of the higher exposed fraction of the population, in whom health effects would be more expected. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151595
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.459
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.999
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, RDen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchweizer, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorJantunen, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, HKen_US
dc.contributor.authorBayerOglesby, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorKatsouyanni, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorNieuwenhuijsen, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSaarela, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorSram, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorKünzli, Nen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:25:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:25:16Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Environment, 2005, v. 39 n. 12, p. 2299-2307en_US
dc.identifier.issn1352-2310en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151595-
dc.description.abstractEvaluation of relationships between median residential indoor, indoor workplace and population exposures may obscure potential strategies for exposure reduction. Evaluation of participants with personal exposures above median levels in the EXPOLIS study in Athens, Helsinki, Oxford and Prague illustrated that these participants frequently showed a different relationship to indoor and workplace levels than that shown by the population median. Thus, prioritization of environments for control measures based on median exposures may exclude important areas where effectively focused control measures are possible, and may therefore have little impact on the highest and most harmful exposures. Further, personal exposures at the upper end of the distribution may exceed the US EPA inhalation reference concentration (Rfc), illustrated here using hexane, naphthalene and benzene. For example upper 90th percentile personal exposures to benzene in Athens and Prague were 64 and 27 μg m-3 with peak exposures of 217 and 38 μg m-3, respectively for non-ETS exposed participants relative to an Rfc of 30 μg m-3. Strategies to reduce exposures to individual compounds, therefore, may benefit from focus on the high end of the distribution to identify activities and behaviors that result in elevated exposures. Control strategies targeting activities that lead to exposures in the upper end of the distribution would reduce the variability associated with population median values by bringing the upper end of the exposure distribution closer to median values. Thus, compliance with health-based standards would be more protective of the higher exposed fraction of the population, in whom health effects would be more expected. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atmosenven_US
dc.relation.ispartofAtmospheric Environmenten_US
dc.subjectBenzeneen_US
dc.subjectExposuresen_US
dc.subjectHexaneen_US
dc.subjectIndoor Sourcesen_US
dc.subjectMicroenvironment Concentrationsen_US
dc.subjectNaphthaleneen_US
dc.subjectVolatile Organic Compoundsen_US
dc.titlePersonal exposures to VOC in the upper end of the distribution - Relationships to indoor, outdoor and workplace concentrationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLai, HK:laihk@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLai, HK=rp01527en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.atmosenv.2004.12.026en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-17344371463en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-17344371463&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage2299en_US
dc.identifier.epage2307en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228945400013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEdwards, RD=7403978901en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchweizer, C=8404193500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJantunen, M=26643559000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, HK=11739685900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBayerOglesby, L=6507948222en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKatsouyanni, K=7007143743en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNieuwenhuijsen, M=7007123042en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSaarela, K=35609651100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSram, R=7007115406en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKünzli, N=7006806977en_US

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