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Article: The effects of cash and lottery incentives on mailed surveys to physicians: A randomized trial

TitleThe effects of cash and lottery incentives on mailed surveys to physicians: A randomized trial
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jclinepi
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Epidemiology, 2002, v. 55 n. 8, p. 801-807 How to Cite?
AbstractLow response rates, especially among physicians, are a common problem in mailed survey research. We conducted a randomized trial to examine the effects of cash and lottery incentives on response rates. A total of 4,850 subjects were randomized to one of three interventions accompanying a mailed survey - no incentive (n = 1,700), cash payment [three levels of Hong Kong dollars (HKD) $10, $20, and $40; N = 50 in each subgroup], or entry into a lottery (three levels of HKD$1,000, $2,000, and $4,000; N = 1,000 in each subgroup) on receipt of the completed questionnaire. The response rates were higher among those offered incentives than those without (19.8% vs. 16.8%, P = .012). Cash was the more effective incentive compared to lottery (27.3% vs. 19.4%, P = .017). Response also increased substantially between the first and second mailings (14.2% vs. 18.8%, P > .001). In addition, those with specialist qualifications were more willing to participate in mailed surveys. We found no significant differences in response outcomes among the various incentive arms. Cash reward at the $20 level was the most cost-effective intervention, in terms of cost per responder. Further systematic examination of the effects of different incentive strategies in epidemiologic studies should be encouraged. © 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151567
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.703
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.559
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLeung, GMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, MFen_US
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, FKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:24:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:24:47Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Epidemiology, 2002, v. 55 n. 8, p. 801-807en_US
dc.identifier.issn0895-4356en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151567-
dc.description.abstractLow response rates, especially among physicians, are a common problem in mailed survey research. We conducted a randomized trial to examine the effects of cash and lottery incentives on response rates. A total of 4,850 subjects were randomized to one of three interventions accompanying a mailed survey - no incentive (n = 1,700), cash payment [three levels of Hong Kong dollars (HKD) $10, $20, and $40; N = 50 in each subgroup], or entry into a lottery (three levels of HKD$1,000, $2,000, and $4,000; N = 1,000 in each subgroup) on receipt of the completed questionnaire. The response rates were higher among those offered incentives than those without (19.8% vs. 16.8%, P = .012). Cash was the more effective incentive compared to lottery (27.3% vs. 19.4%, P = .017). Response also increased substantially between the first and second mailings (14.2% vs. 18.8%, P > .001). In addition, those with specialist qualifications were more willing to participate in mailed surveys. We found no significant differences in response outcomes among the various incentive arms. Cash reward at the $20 level was the most cost-effective intervention, in terms of cost per responder. Further systematic examination of the effects of different incentive strategies in epidemiologic studies should be encouraged. © 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jclinepien_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Epidemiologyen_US
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Epidemiology. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.-
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAttitude Of Health Personnelen_US
dc.subject.meshChoice Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMotivationen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysicians - Psychologyen_US
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen_US
dc.subject.meshReimbursement, Incentiveen_US
dc.subject.meshToken Economyen_US
dc.titleThe effects of cash and lottery incentives on mailed surveys to physicians: A randomized trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, GM:gmleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailHo, LM:lmho@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJohnston, JM:jjohnsto@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, GM=rp00460en_US
dc.identifier.authorityHo, LM=rp00360en_US
dc.identifier.authorityJohnston, JM=rp00375en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0895-4356(02)00442-0en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12384195-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036697762en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros74810-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036697762&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume55en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage801en_US
dc.identifier.epage807en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000178037500010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, GM=7007159841en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, LM=7402955625en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, MF=35092190200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJohnston, JM=7403397964en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, FK=7201409837en_US

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