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Article: Preliminary evaluation of "interpreter" role plays in teaching communication skills to medical undergraduates

TitlePreliminary evaluation of "interpreter" role plays in teaching communication skills to medical undergraduates
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110
Citation
Medical Education, 2001, v. 35 n. 3, p. 217-221 How to Cite?
AbstractRationale and objectives: Multiculturalism presents linguistic obstacles to health care provision. We explored the early introduction of "interpreter" role-play exercises in teaching medical undergraduates communication skills. The interpreter role creates a natural barrier in communication providing an active prompt for recognizing learning needs in this area. Methods: Bilingual Cantonese first-year medical students (n = 160) were randomly allocated to either "Observer" or "Interpreter" role plays at a small-group introductory communication skills workshop using a quasi experimental design, counterbalanced across tutors. Students assessed their own skill competence before and, together with their perceptions of the different role plays' effectiveness, again after the workshop, using an anonymous 16 item Likert-type scale, analysed using ANOVA and MANOVA. Results: Students' assessments of their skills improved significantly following the workshop (F = 73.19 [1,156], P = 0.0009). Students in the observer group reported greater changes in their scores following the workshop than did students in the interpreter group (F = 4.84 [1,156], P = 0.029), largely due to improvement in perceived skill (F = 4.38 [1,156], P = 0.038) rather than perceived programme effectiveness (F = 3.13 [1,156], P > 0.05). Subsequent MANOVA indicated no main effect of observer/interpreter conditions, indicating these differences could be attributed to chance alone (F = 1.41 [16 141], P > 0.05). Conclusion: The workshop positively influenced students' perceived communication skills, but the "Interpreter" role was less effective than the "Observer" role in achieving this. Future studies should examine whether interpreter role plays introduced later in the medical programme are beneficial.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151559
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.369
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.913
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, KCJen_US
dc.contributor.authorStewart, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:24:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:24:40Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationMedical Education, 2001, v. 35 n. 3, p. 217-221en_US
dc.identifier.issn0308-0110en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151559-
dc.description.abstractRationale and objectives: Multiculturalism presents linguistic obstacles to health care provision. We explored the early introduction of "interpreter" role-play exercises in teaching medical undergraduates communication skills. The interpreter role creates a natural barrier in communication providing an active prompt for recognizing learning needs in this area. Methods: Bilingual Cantonese first-year medical students (n = 160) were randomly allocated to either "Observer" or "Interpreter" role plays at a small-group introductory communication skills workshop using a quasi experimental design, counterbalanced across tutors. Students assessed their own skill competence before and, together with their perceptions of the different role plays' effectiveness, again after the workshop, using an anonymous 16 item Likert-type scale, analysed using ANOVA and MANOVA. Results: Students' assessments of their skills improved significantly following the workshop (F = 73.19 [1,156], P = 0.0009). Students in the observer group reported greater changes in their scores following the workshop than did students in the interpreter group (F = 4.84 [1,156], P = 0.029), largely due to improvement in perceived skill (F = 4.38 [1,156], P = 0.038) rather than perceived programme effectiveness (F = 3.13 [1,156], P > 0.05). Subsequent MANOVA indicated no main effect of observer/interpreter conditions, indicating these differences could be attributed to chance alone (F = 1.41 [16 141], P > 0.05). Conclusion: The workshop positively influenced students' perceived communication skills, but the "Interpreter" role was less effective than the "Observer" role in achieving this. Future studies should examine whether interpreter role plays introduced later in the medical programme are beneficial.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0308-0110en_US
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Educationen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshCommunicationen_US
dc.subject.meshCommunication Barriersen_US
dc.subject.meshEducation, Medical, Undergraduateen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshRole Playingen_US
dc.subject.meshTeaching - Methodsen_US
dc.titlePreliminary evaluation of "interpreter" role plays in teaching communication skills to medical undergraduatesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2923.2001.00731.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid11260443-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035100097en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros62436-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035100097&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume35en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage217en_US
dc.identifier.epage221en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167645800009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, KCJ=36722698300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStewart, SM=35460013800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_US

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