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Article: Using the Community Health Index, general practitioner records and the National Health Service Central Registry for a 14 year follow-up of a middle-aged cohort in the west of Scotland.

TitleUsing the Community Health Index, general practitioner records and the National Health Service Central Registry for a 14 year follow-up of a middle-aged cohort in the west of Scotland.
Authors
Issue Date1993
Citation
Health Bulletin, 1993, v. 51 n. 1, p. 28-33 How to Cite?
AbstractRecord linkage provides an opportunity for relatively inexpensive follow-up in cohort studies. Most studies have used hospital records. However, the Community Health Index, which is a computer-held list of all patients registered with General Practitioners (GPs), now offers opportunities for measuring morbidity at the primary care level. Searching for patients individually on this computer-held Index, we identified 96% of a middle-aged cohort recruited 14 years earlier in a longitudinal study in the West of Scotland. Of these, information was obtained for 78% through direct postal survey and for 87% through contact with GPs. In total, follow-up information was obtained on 903 (92%) of those thought to be alive. The National Health Service Central Registry records data and cause of death and will pass this information to special studies which have 'flagged' individuals' records. Seven per cent of the deaths in this sample had been missed by this process. This may need to be taken into account in previous studies of mortality for this cohort. New studies could expect successful long-term follow-up through record linkage to the Index or the Registry, and automatic record linkage with the Index would be worth investigating.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151510
ISSN
2005 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.133

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJanghorbani, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, RBen_US
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:24:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:24:07Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_US
dc.identifier.citationHealth Bulletin, 1993, v. 51 n. 1, p. 28-33en_US
dc.identifier.issn0374-8014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151510-
dc.description.abstractRecord linkage provides an opportunity for relatively inexpensive follow-up in cohort studies. Most studies have used hospital records. However, the Community Health Index, which is a computer-held list of all patients registered with General Practitioners (GPs), now offers opportunities for measuring morbidity at the primary care level. Searching for patients individually on this computer-held Index, we identified 96% of a middle-aged cohort recruited 14 years earlier in a longitudinal study in the West of Scotland. Of these, information was obtained for 78% through direct postal survey and for 87% through contact with GPs. In total, follow-up information was obtained on 903 (92%) of those thought to be alive. The National Health Service Central Registry records data and cause of death and will pass this information to special studies which have 'flagged' individuals' records. Seven per cent of the deaths in this sample had been missed by this process. This may need to be taken into account in previous studies of mortality for this cohort. New studies could expect successful long-term follow-up through record linkage to the Index or the Registry, and automatic record linkage with the Index would be worth investigating.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofHealth bulletinen_US
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshCommunity Health Servicesen_US
dc.subject.meshFamily Practiceen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHealth Status Indicatorsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLongitudinal Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMedical Record Linkageen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMorbidityen_US
dc.subject.meshScotlanden_US
dc.titleUsing the Community Health Index, general practitioner records and the National Health Service Central Registry for a 14 year follow-up of a middle-aged cohort in the west of Scotland.en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid8432635-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027345595en_US
dc.identifier.volume51en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage28en_US
dc.identifier.epage33en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJanghorbani, M=7006225888en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, RB=10042286500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_US

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