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Article: The quality and relevance of peripheral neuropathy data on a diabetic clinical information system

TitleThe quality and relevance of peripheral neuropathy data on a diabetic clinical information system
Authors
Issue Date1992
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/DME
Citation
Diabetic Medicine, 1992, v. 9 n. 10, p. 934-937 How to Cite?
AbstractRoutinely collected peripheral neuropathy data entered on a diabetic clinical information system since 1979 have been audited for completeness, consistency, accuracy (interobserver variation), validity by comparison with biothesiometry, and relevance by life table analysis for foot ulceration. Peripheral neuropathy was defined by a neuropathy disability score ≥4. The data were 98% complete. Forty-nine of 3405 (1.4%) had inconsistent records. Agreement between observers for clinical examination was significant (p<0.05) for aggregate neuropathy score and its individual components except the knee jerk: Kappa score for observer variation for neuropathy score 0.56 (95% confidence interval 0.36-0.76). There was good agreement between neuropathy defined as aggregate score ≥4, and as combined vibration perception thresholds for both feet >60 V: Kappa statistic 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.44-0.80). The chance of developing a foot problem in 3 years increased from 3% for patients with a score of zero to 45% for people with a score of between 9 and 12. We conclude that the calculation of a clinical neuropathy score is a simple, valid and relevant method for diabetes care both in hospital and the community. When combined with palpation of peripheral pulses most patients at risk of foot ulceration can be identified allowing targeting of preventive chiropody and orthotic resources.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151498
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.152
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.654
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJones, RBen_US
dc.contributor.authorGregory, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, EWen_US
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorAllison, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorMcleod, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorTitterington, DMen_US
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:23:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:23:59Z-
dc.date.issued1992en_US
dc.identifier.citationDiabetic Medicine, 1992, v. 9 n. 10, p. 934-937en_US
dc.identifier.issn0742-3071en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151498-
dc.description.abstractRoutinely collected peripheral neuropathy data entered on a diabetic clinical information system since 1979 have been audited for completeness, consistency, accuracy (interobserver variation), validity by comparison with biothesiometry, and relevance by life table analysis for foot ulceration. Peripheral neuropathy was defined by a neuropathy disability score ≥4. The data were 98% complete. Forty-nine of 3405 (1.4%) had inconsistent records. Agreement between observers for clinical examination was significant (p<0.05) for aggregate neuropathy score and its individual components except the knee jerk: Kappa score for observer variation for neuropathy score 0.56 (95% confidence interval 0.36-0.76). There was good agreement between neuropathy defined as aggregate score ≥4, and as combined vibration perception thresholds for both feet >60 V: Kappa statistic 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.44-0.80). The chance of developing a foot problem in 3 years increased from 3% for patients with a score of zero to 45% for people with a score of between 9 and 12. We conclude that the calculation of a clinical neuropathy score is a simple, valid and relevant method for diabetes care both in hospital and the community. When combined with palpation of peripheral pulses most patients at risk of foot ulceration can be identified allowing targeting of preventive chiropody and orthotic resources.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/DMEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetic Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetic Neuropathies - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFoot Diseases - Epidemiology - Etiology - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInformation Systems - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshMedical Records - Standardsen_US
dc.subject.meshNeurologic Examinationen_US
dc.subject.meshPeripheral Nerves - Physiopathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshProbabilityen_US
dc.titleThe quality and relevance of peripheral neuropathy data on a diabetic clinical information systemen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1478039-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026445329en_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage934en_US
dc.identifier.epage937en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1992KB03300010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, RB=10042286500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGregory, R=7402332269en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, EW=7404236278en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKerr, D=38061584900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAllison, SP=7202703040en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMcLeod, A=7103313165en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTitterington, DM=35556336100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_US

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