File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Acute abdominal pain and appendicitis in north east Thailand

TitleAcute abdominal pain and appendicitis in north east Thailand
Authors
Issue Date1989
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PPE
Citation
Paediatric And Perinatal Epidemiology, 1989, v. 3 n. 4, p. 448-459 How to Cite?
AbstractIn a survey of emergency admissions to hospital in rural Thailand, acute appendicitis was the commonest cause of acute abdominal pain. Estimates of the incidence of appendicitis, in two series comprising a total of 356 patients, at 3.2 and 3.7 per 10,000 population per year, were relatively high compared with reports from other warm climate countries. In comparison with 1825 cases in studies sponsored by the Organisation Mondiale de Gastroenterologie (OMGE), Thai patients with acute appendicitis were older, presented late and experienced more complications than those in 14 other countries. In Khon Kaen only 2-3% of the cases were children aged 0-9 years, compared with 9-26% in the OMGE series. In patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain in Thailand, acute appendicitis was diagnosed more often than non-specific abdominal pain. The converse was true in OMGE series. This may reflect the longer distances travelled to hospital by many patients and delays between onset of symptoms and admission to hospital. Acute appendicitis was the commonest definitive diagnosis in both series. This survey indicates that relatively high rates of acute appendicitis may occur in populations eating traditional diets. The results are consistent with the recently described hypothesis of an infective aetiology and increases in appendicitis rates may be expected in people born since the introduction of improvements in environmental sanitation. Further studies are needed to examine trends in the incidence of appendicitis in populations eating traditional diets with both high and low fibre content and to investigate the significance of changing social and environmental factors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151479
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.958
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.514

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChatbanchai, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorEbrahim, SBJen_US
dc.contributor.authorAreemit, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorHoskyns, EWen_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Dombal, FTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:23:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:23:46Z-
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.citationPaediatric And Perinatal Epidemiology, 1989, v. 3 n. 4, p. 448-459en_US
dc.identifier.issn0269-5022en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151479-
dc.description.abstractIn a survey of emergency admissions to hospital in rural Thailand, acute appendicitis was the commonest cause of acute abdominal pain. Estimates of the incidence of appendicitis, in two series comprising a total of 356 patients, at 3.2 and 3.7 per 10,000 population per year, were relatively high compared with reports from other warm climate countries. In comparison with 1825 cases in studies sponsored by the Organisation Mondiale de Gastroenterologie (OMGE), Thai patients with acute appendicitis were older, presented late and experienced more complications than those in 14 other countries. In Khon Kaen only 2-3% of the cases were children aged 0-9 years, compared with 9-26% in the OMGE series. In patients admitted to hospital with acute abdominal pain in Thailand, acute appendicitis was diagnosed more often than non-specific abdominal pain. The converse was true in OMGE series. This may reflect the longer distances travelled to hospital by many patients and delays between onset of symptoms and admission to hospital. Acute appendicitis was the commonest definitive diagnosis in both series. This survey indicates that relatively high rates of acute appendicitis may occur in populations eating traditional diets. The results are consistent with the recently described hypothesis of an infective aetiology and increases in appendicitis rates may be expected in people born since the introduction of improvements in environmental sanitation. Further studies are needed to examine trends in the incidence of appendicitis in populations eating traditional diets with both high and low fibre content and to investigate the significance of changing social and environmental factors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PPEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPaediatric and Perinatal Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAbdomen, Acute - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAbdominal Pain - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAppendicitis - Complications - Etiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Cultural Comparisonen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshEngland - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshThailand - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleAcute abdominal pain and appendicitis in north east Thailanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2587411-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0024448307en_US
dc.identifier.volume3en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage448en_US
dc.identifier.epage459en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChatbanchai, W=6504095967en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEbrahim, SBJ=7102093023en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAreemit, S=6505827408en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHoskyns, EW=6602569177en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Dombal, FT=8075886800en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats