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Article: Adjusting follow-up intervals in a diabetic clinic: Implications for costs and quality of care

TitleAdjusting follow-up intervals in a diabetic clinic: Implications for costs and quality of care
Authors
Issue Date1986
Citation
Journal Of The Royal College Of Physicians Of London, 1986, v. 20 n. 1, p. 36-39 How to Cite?
AbstractOne of the main determinants of cost in the follow-up of patients with chronic disease is the frequency with which they are seen in out-patient clinics. The implementation of clinical information systems allows this relationship to be investigated and rationalised. Such potential uses of clinical information systems should be considered when evaluating the costs and benefits of implementation. In 2,226 diabetic clinic attenders, of ten variables studied, the doctor seen was one of the most consistent significant predictors (P<0.001) of follow-up intervals and many patients were seen more often than was probably necessary. An increase of 30 per cent in all follow-up intervals would be clinically acceptable and would allow nearly 2,000 known non-attenders to be given a biannual examination. The increase in total annual costs would probably be less than 5 per cent.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151452
ISSN
2002 Impact Factor: 0.624
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJones, RBen_US
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:23:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:23:32Z-
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Royal College Of Physicians Of London, 1986, v. 20 n. 1, p. 36-39en_US
dc.identifier.issn0035-8819en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151452-
dc.description.abstractOne of the main determinants of cost in the follow-up of patients with chronic disease is the frequency with which they are seen in out-patient clinics. The implementation of clinical information systems allows this relationship to be investigated and rationalised. Such potential uses of clinical information systems should be considered when evaluating the costs and benefits of implementation. In 2,226 diabetic clinic attenders, of ten variables studied, the doctor seen was one of the most consistent significant predictors (P<0.001) of follow-up intervals and many patients were seen more often than was probably necessary. An increase of 30 per cent in all follow-up intervals would be clinically acceptable and would allow nearly 2,000 known non-attenders to be given a biannual examination. The increase in total annual costs would probably be less than 5 per cent.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Royal College of Physicians of Londonen_US
dc.subject.meshAmbulatory Care - Economicsen_US
dc.subject.meshCosts And Cost Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshDecision Makingen_US
dc.subject.meshDiabetes Mellitus - Economicsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshQuality Of Health Careen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleAdjusting follow-up intervals in a diabetic clinic: Implications for costs and quality of careen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid3944774-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0022645918en_US
dc.identifier.volume20en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage36en_US
dc.identifier.epage39en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1986AXE4700007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJones, RB=10042286500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_US

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