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Article: Hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm: Case reports, treatment considerations and implications for etiology

TitleHemifacial spasm and blepharospasm: Case reports, treatment considerations and implications for etiology
Authors
Issue Date1985
Citation
Behavioural Psychotherapy, 1985, v. 13 n. 3, p. 229-242 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious reports of the effectiveness of behavioural approaches in the treatment of blepharospasm prompted application of a modified behavioral package to two hemifacial spasm patients. The presentation and treatment details of these two cases are described with complete remission of symptoms in one patient and 50% reduction in severity for the second patient. Both hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm are traditionally unresponsive to medication and are treated by a variety of neurosurgical techniques, thus implying a strong organic etiology for the conditions. The cases presented here, and earlier cases presented elsewhere suggest that a learning model may be appropriate to explain etiology for an unknown number of patients who are surgically treated at present. This is discussed in the light of existing literature on the conditions along with methodological and theoretical issues.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151450
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFielding, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:23:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:23:31Z-
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.identifier.citationBehavioural Psychotherapy, 1985, v. 13 n. 3, p. 229-242en_US
dc.identifier.issn0141-3473en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151450-
dc.description.abstractPrevious reports of the effectiveness of behavioural approaches in the treatment of blepharospasm prompted application of a modified behavioral package to two hemifacial spasm patients. The presentation and treatment details of these two cases are described with complete remission of symptoms in one patient and 50% reduction in severity for the second patient. Both hemifacial spasm and blepharospasm are traditionally unresponsive to medication and are treated by a variety of neurosurgical techniques, thus implying a strong organic etiology for the conditions. The cases presented here, and earlier cases presented elsewhere suggest that a learning model may be appropriate to explain etiology for an unknown number of patients who are surgically treated at present. This is discussed in the light of existing literature on the conditions along with methodological and theoretical issues.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBehavioural Psychotherapyen_US
dc.titleHemifacial spasm and blepharospasm: Case reports, treatment considerations and implications for etiologyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailFielding, R:fielding@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityFielding, R=rp00339en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0022255129en_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage229en_US
dc.identifier.epage242en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFielding, R=7102200484en_US

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