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Article: The distribution and association of blood pressure in an adolescent population

TitleThe distribution and association of blood pressure in an adolescent population
Authors
Issue Date1982
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 1982, v. 36 n. 1, p. 35-42 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this report we describe the distribution of blood pressure and its association in adolescence. Six hundred and twenty-five subjects aged 13 to 18 were drawn from three general practices in different urban and rural settings. Systolic pressures were higher and rose with age in boys x̄ = 119 mm Hg) compared with girls x̄ = 114 mm Hg), who showed no age association. Diastolic pressures (phase 5) were higher in girls x̄ = 64 mm Hg) than in boys x̄ = 60 mm Hg) and showed no association with age in either sex. Initial blood pressures were generally higher than those recorded after a further five minutes' rest in the sitting position, although diastolic pressures rose on the second reading in the older subjects. Systolic pressures of subjects from the suburban practice and in the late autumn were relatively low; diastolic pressures tended to be lower in the spring and in subjects from the rural practice. Systolic pressures were lower in the morning and this was found to be primarily related to fasting status. Individuals with a positive family history of hypertension had significantly higher blood pressures than those with a negative history. Boys who frequently played sports had lower diastolic pressures, largely accounting for the above sex difference. We conclude that although blood pressure measurement in adolescence is a difficult screening procedure it should be offered to selected groups such as those with a family history of hypertension.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151427
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.865
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.890
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOrchard, TJen_US
dc.contributor.authorHedley, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, JRAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:23:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:23:12Z-
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Epidemiology And Community Health, 1982, v. 36 n. 1, p. 35-42en_US
dc.identifier.issn0143-005Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151427-
dc.description.abstractIn this report we describe the distribution of blood pressure and its association in adolescence. Six hundred and twenty-five subjects aged 13 to 18 were drawn from three general practices in different urban and rural settings. Systolic pressures were higher and rose with age in boys x̄ = 119 mm Hg) compared with girls x̄ = 114 mm Hg), who showed no age association. Diastolic pressures (phase 5) were higher in girls x̄ = 64 mm Hg) than in boys x̄ = 60 mm Hg) and showed no association with age in either sex. Initial blood pressures were generally higher than those recorded after a further five minutes' rest in the sitting position, although diastolic pressures rose on the second reading in the older subjects. Systolic pressures of subjects from the suburban practice and in the late autumn were relatively low; diastolic pressures tended to be lower in the spring and in subjects from the rural practice. Systolic pressures were lower in the morning and this was found to be primarily related to fasting status. Individuals with a positive family history of hypertension had significantly higher blood pressures than those with a negative history. Boys who frequently played sports had lower diastolic pressures, largely accounting for the above sex difference. We conclude that although blood pressure measurement in adolescence is a difficult screening procedure it should be offered to selected groups such as those with a family history of hypertension.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jech.bmjjournals.com/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Epidemiology and Community Healthen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Pressureen_US
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshEnglanden_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshHypertension - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshLife Styleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMass Screeningen_US
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.titleThe distribution and association of blood pressure in an adolescent populationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHedley, AJ:hrmrajh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHedley, AJ=rp00357en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid6978373-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0020003844en_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage35en_US
dc.identifier.epage42en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1982ND68800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOrchard, TJ=7102290820en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHedley, AJ=7102584095en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMitchell, JRA=24302858200en_US

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