File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Environmental change and Neolithic settlement movement in the lower Yangtze wetlands of China

TitleEnvironmental change and Neolithic settlement movement in the lower Yangtze wetlands of China
Authors
KeywordsCoastal plain
Coastal wetland
Environmental change
Environmental conditions
Flooding
Issue Date2012
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://hol.sagepub.com
Citation
The Holocene, 2012, v. 22 n. 6, p. 659-673 How to Cite?
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that, over the course of the Neolithic period, settlements in the Yangtze coastal plain gradually moved seawards and concentrated to the east of Lake Taihu, probably responding to the effects of sea-level change during the middle to late Holocene. To test this hypothesis, sediment cores adjacent to six Neolithic settlement sites across the study area were collected and analyzed for pollen and other microfossils. These records reveal details of the environmental conditions before, during and after the Neolithic occupation at each site. Results show that a freshwater marsh environment became established before each human occupation and persisted throughout and after it. There is no evidence at any site of a sudden or drastic change in environmental conditions towards the end of human settlement. After c. 7000 cal. yr BP the study area had become a wetland enclosed by Chenier ridges on the east (the southern shore of the Yangtze) and the south (the northern shore of Hangzhou Bay). During the Neolithic period (c. 7000-3000 cal. yr BP) sea level rose slowly by c. 2 m, and elevated water-tables saw the inland Taihu area become lacustrine, while to seaward on slightly higher ground enhanced sedimentation maintained freshwater marshes, fens and swamp-woodland, particularly near the Chenier ridges. These wetland-fringed coastal areas provided resources, including shellfish, deer, boar and migratory birds, that might have attracted the Neolithic communities that were abandoning their former settlement sites in the lower-lying inland area, flooded by the expanded lakes around Taihu, after c. 4200 cal. BP. © The Author(s) 2011.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151380
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 3.794
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Leverhulme Trust, UKF/000128/AL
Shanghai Metropolitan Government
Funding Information:

This research is funded by the Leverhulme Trust, UK (Grant Number F/000128/AL) and supported by the Zijiang Visiting Professorship scheme of the Shanghai Metropolitan Government awarded to Y Zong.

References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. University of Durham
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. East China Normal University
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZong, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorInnes, JBen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:21:26Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:21:26Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe Holocene, 2012, v. 22 n. 6, p. 659-673en_US
dc.identifier.issn0959-6836en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151380-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies have suggested that, over the course of the Neolithic period, settlements in the Yangtze coastal plain gradually moved seawards and concentrated to the east of Lake Taihu, probably responding to the effects of sea-level change during the middle to late Holocene. To test this hypothesis, sediment cores adjacent to six Neolithic settlement sites across the study area were collected and analyzed for pollen and other microfossils. These records reveal details of the environmental conditions before, during and after the Neolithic occupation at each site. Results show that a freshwater marsh environment became established before each human occupation and persisted throughout and after it. There is no evidence at any site of a sudden or drastic change in environmental conditions towards the end of human settlement. After c. 7000 cal. yr BP the study area had become a wetland enclosed by Chenier ridges on the east (the southern shore of the Yangtze) and the south (the northern shore of Hangzhou Bay). During the Neolithic period (c. 7000-3000 cal. yr BP) sea level rose slowly by c. 2 m, and elevated water-tables saw the inland Taihu area become lacustrine, while to seaward on slightly higher ground enhanced sedimentation maintained freshwater marshes, fens and swamp-woodland, particularly near the Chenier ridges. These wetland-fringed coastal areas provided resources, including shellfish, deer, boar and migratory birds, that might have attracted the Neolithic communities that were abandoning their former settlement sites in the lower-lying inland area, flooded by the expanded lakes around Taihu, after c. 4200 cal. BP. © The Author(s) 2011.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://hol.sagepub.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofThe Holoceneen_US
dc.rightsThe Holocene. Copyright © Sage Publications Ltd.-
dc.subjectCoastal plainen_US
dc.subjectCoastal wetlanden_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental changeen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental conditionsen_US
dc.subjectFloodingen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental change and Neolithic settlement movement in the lower Yangtze wetlands of Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZong, Y: yqzong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZong, Y=rp00846en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0959683611414933en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84861808961en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros200202-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84861808961&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage659en_US
dc.identifier.epage673en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000304238500006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, Z=35209923100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Z=8888585200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridInnes, JB=7102004815en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZong, Y=7005203454en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats