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Article: Screening for fever by remote-sensing infrared thermographic camera

TitleScreening for fever by remote-sensing infrared thermographic camera
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1195-1982
Citation
Journal Of Travel Medicine, 2004, v. 11 n. 5, p. 273-279 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Following the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, remote-sensing infrared thermography (IRT) has been advocated as a possible means of screening for fever in travelers at airports and border crossings, but its applicability has not been established. We therefore set out to evaluate (1) the feasibility of IRT imaging to identify subjects with fever, and (2) the optimal instrumental configuration and validity for such testing. Methods: Over a 20-day inclusive period, 176 subjects (49 hospital inpatients without SARS or suspected SARS, 99 health clinic attendees and 28 healthy volunteers) were recruited. Remotely sensed IRT readings were obtained from various parts of the front and side of the face (at distances of 1.5 and 0.5 m), and compared to concurrently determined body temperature measurements using conventional means (aural tympanic IRT and oral mercury thermometry). The resulting data were submitted to linear regression/correlation and sensitivity analyses. All recruits gave prior informed consent and our Faculty Institutional Review Board approved the protocol. Results: Optimal correlations were found between conventionally measured body temperatures and IRT readings from (1) the front of the face at 1.5 m with the mouth open (r = 0.80), (2) the ear at 0.5 m (r = 0.79), and (3) the side of the face at 1.5 m (r = 0.76). Average IRT readings from the forehead and elsewhere were 1°C to 2°C lower and correlated less well. Ear IRT readings at 0.5 m yielded the narrowest confidence intervals and could be used to predict conventional body temperature readings of ≥ 38°C with a sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 88% respectively. Conclusions: IRT readings from the side of the face, especially from the ear at 0.5 m, yielded the most reliable, precise and consistent estimates of conventionally determined body temperatures. Our results have important implications for walk-through IRT scanning/screening systems at airports and border crossings, particularly as the point prevalence of fever in such subjects would be very low.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151351
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 1.579
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.738
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, LSen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, GTYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLauder, IJen_US
dc.contributor.authorKumana, CRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:20:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:20:58Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Travel Medicine, 2004, v. 11 n. 5, p. 273-279en_US
dc.identifier.issn1195-1982en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151351-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Following the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, remote-sensing infrared thermography (IRT) has been advocated as a possible means of screening for fever in travelers at airports and border crossings, but its applicability has not been established. We therefore set out to evaluate (1) the feasibility of IRT imaging to identify subjects with fever, and (2) the optimal instrumental configuration and validity for such testing. Methods: Over a 20-day inclusive period, 176 subjects (49 hospital inpatients without SARS or suspected SARS, 99 health clinic attendees and 28 healthy volunteers) were recruited. Remotely sensed IRT readings were obtained from various parts of the front and side of the face (at distances of 1.5 and 0.5 m), and compared to concurrently determined body temperature measurements using conventional means (aural tympanic IRT and oral mercury thermometry). The resulting data were submitted to linear regression/correlation and sensitivity analyses. All recruits gave prior informed consent and our Faculty Institutional Review Board approved the protocol. Results: Optimal correlations were found between conventionally measured body temperatures and IRT readings from (1) the front of the face at 1.5 m with the mouth open (r = 0.80), (2) the ear at 0.5 m (r = 0.79), and (3) the side of the face at 1.5 m (r = 0.76). Average IRT readings from the forehead and elsewhere were 1°C to 2°C lower and correlated less well. Ear IRT readings at 0.5 m yielded the narrowest confidence intervals and could be used to predict conventional body temperature readings of ≥ 38°C with a sensitivity and specificity of 83% and 88% respectively. Conclusions: IRT readings from the side of the face, especially from the ear at 0.5 m, yielded the most reliable, precise and consistent estimates of conventionally determined body temperatures. Our results have important implications for walk-through IRT scanning/screening systems at airports and border crossings, particularly as the point prevalence of fever in such subjects would be very low.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=1195-1982en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Travel Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAerospace Medicineen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshChilden_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshEaren_US
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFever - Diagnosisen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMass Screening - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshReproducibility Of Resultsen_US
dc.subject.meshSensitivity And Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshThermographyen_US
dc.subject.meshTravelen_US
dc.titleScreening for fever by remote-sensing infrared thermographic cameraen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, LS:chanls@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, LS=rp00665en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid15544710-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-8344256467en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros102787-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-8344256467&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage273en_US
dc.identifier.epage279en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224181400002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, LS=7403540528en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, GTY=55108882600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLauder, IJ=35564928000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKumana, CR=7005112381en_US

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