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Article: Structural and geochronological constraints on the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibetan Plateau

TitleStructural and geochronological constraints on the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibetan Plateau
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Tectonics, 2011, v. 30 n. 6 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Longmen Shan thrust belt in the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau underwent deformation of D 1 associated with the Late Triassic collision between the North and South China Blocks, followed by deformation of D 2 and D 3 related to the eastward growth of the Tibetan Plateau. The D 1 is marked by moderately tight folds (f 1), spaced cleavage (S 1), mineral lineation (L 1), multistage reactivated faults, and top-to-the south thrusting. This deformation initiated before 237 Ma and ended at 208 Ma. The 193-159 Ma D 2 deformation is top-to-the-southeast directed and normal ductile in nature and was associated with the formation of half-graben basins. The Mesozoic deformation of the Longmen Shan belt was related to the subduction of the Paleo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere, followed by the South China Block underneath the Songpan-Ganze Terrane. The D 1 was produced in the pro-side of the overriding Songpan-Ganze plate, most probably driven by slab corner flow above the retreating South China Block. The D 2 and extensional Songpan-Ganze turbidite basin were produced by roll-back and migration of the overriding plate above the retreating subduction zone. This model for the deformation from D 1 to D 2 is similar to a Mediterranean-style model. The D 3 is characterized by SE-ward thrusting with stepwise migration of rapid denudation and dextral strike-slip faulting during the Late Cretaceous to present. Therefore, the Longmen Shan thrust belt involved Mesozoic compressional and extensional events that were overprinted by the Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic compressional event. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151339
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.75
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.628
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Basic Research Program of China2009CB421001
NSFC40872140
40921062
111 ProjectB07011
China Petroleum and Chemical CooperationCPCC09-01
Funding Information:

This study was supported by research grants from the National Basic Research Program of China (2009CB421001), NSFC (projects 40872140 and 40921062), the 111 Project (B07011), and China Petroleum and Chemical Cooperation (CPCC09-01). We thank H. L. Qiu for assistance with Ar-Ar dating and W. M. Yuan with the Apatite Fission Track Analyses. Paul T. Robinson and Jian-Wei Li are greatly acknowledged for helping with the preparation of this paper. We appreciate thorough reviews by T. Ehlers, P. Kapp, and A. Pullen, whose insights helped to improve this paper.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYan, DPen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, MFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, SBen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, GQen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:20:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:20:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationTectonics, 2011, v. 30 n. 6en_US
dc.identifier.issn0278-7407en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151339-
dc.description.abstractThe Longmen Shan thrust belt in the eastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau underwent deformation of D 1 associated with the Late Triassic collision between the North and South China Blocks, followed by deformation of D 2 and D 3 related to the eastward growth of the Tibetan Plateau. The D 1 is marked by moderately tight folds (f 1), spaced cleavage (S 1), mineral lineation (L 1), multistage reactivated faults, and top-to-the south thrusting. This deformation initiated before 237 Ma and ended at 208 Ma. The 193-159 Ma D 2 deformation is top-to-the-southeast directed and normal ductile in nature and was associated with the formation of half-graben basins. The Mesozoic deformation of the Longmen Shan belt was related to the subduction of the Paleo-Tethys oceanic lithosphere, followed by the South China Block underneath the Songpan-Ganze Terrane. The D 1 was produced in the pro-side of the overriding Songpan-Ganze plate, most probably driven by slab corner flow above the retreating South China Block. The D 2 and extensional Songpan-Ganze turbidite basin were produced by roll-back and migration of the overriding plate above the retreating subduction zone. This model for the deformation from D 1 to D 2 is similar to a Mediterranean-style model. The D 3 is characterized by SE-ward thrusting with stepwise migration of rapid denudation and dextral strike-slip faulting during the Late Cretaceous to present. Therefore, the Longmen Shan thrust belt involved Mesozoic compressional and extensional events that were overprinted by the Late Cretaceous to Cenozoic compressional event. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTectonicsen_US
dc.titleStructural and geochronological constraints on the Mesozoic-Cenozoic tectonic evolution of the Longmen Shan thrust belt, eastern Tibetan Plateauen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhou, MF:mfzhou@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhou, MF=rp00844en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2011TC002867en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80755125322en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80755125322&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume30en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297063400001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan, DP=36683417500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, MF=7403506005en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, SB=54406986400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, GQ=47562152700en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10006701-

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