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Article: Impacts of temporal CO 2 and climate trends on the detection of ocean anthropogenic CO 2 accumulation

TitleImpacts of temporal CO 2 and climate trends on the detection of ocean anthropogenic CO 2 accumulation
Authors
Issue Date2011
Citation
Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 2011, v. 25 n. 3 How to Cite?
AbstractA common approach for estimating the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (C anthro) depends on the linear approximation of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from a suite of physical and biological ocean parameters. The extended multiple linear regression (eMLR) method assumes that baseline correlations and the resulting residual fields will remain constant with time even under the influence of secular climate changes. The validity of these assumptions over the 21st century is tested using a coupled carbon-climate model. Findings demonstrate that the influence of both changing climate and changing chemistry beyond 2-4 decades invalidates the assumption that the residual fields will remain constant resulting in significant errors in the eMLR estimate of C anthro. This study determines that the eMLR method is unable to describe C anthro uptake for a sampling interval of greater than 30 years if the error is to remain below 20% for many regions in the Southern Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and western Pacific Ocean. These results suggest that, for many regions of the ocean basins, hydrographic field investigations have to be repeated at approximately decadal timescales in order to accurately predict the uptake of C anthro by the ocean if the eMLR method is used. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151326
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.495
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.220
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
NOAANA07OAR4310098
University of Hong Kong
Funding Information:

The authors are grateful to I. Lima for his technical assistance and to C. Sabine for providing his estimate of observed anthropogenic carbon along the P16 transect. We would also like to acknowledge the helpful comments of two anonymous reviewers. This work was supported by NOAA grant NA07OAR4310098 (SCD and RW) and funding from the University of Hong Kong (NFG).

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGoodkin, NFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLevine, NMen_US
dc.contributor.authorDoney, SCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWanninkhof, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:20:38Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:20:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles, 2011, v. 25 n. 3en_US
dc.identifier.issn0886-6236en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151326-
dc.description.abstractA common approach for estimating the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (C anthro) depends on the linear approximation of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from a suite of physical and biological ocean parameters. The extended multiple linear regression (eMLR) method assumes that baseline correlations and the resulting residual fields will remain constant with time even under the influence of secular climate changes. The validity of these assumptions over the 21st century is tested using a coupled carbon-climate model. Findings demonstrate that the influence of both changing climate and changing chemistry beyond 2-4 decades invalidates the assumption that the residual fields will remain constant resulting in significant errors in the eMLR estimate of C anthro. This study determines that the eMLR method is unable to describe C anthro uptake for a sampling interval of greater than 30 years if the error is to remain below 20% for many regions in the Southern Ocean, Atlantic Ocean, and western Pacific Ocean. These results suggest that, for many regions of the ocean basins, hydrographic field investigations have to be repeated at approximately decadal timescales in order to accurately predict the uptake of C anthro by the ocean if the eMLR method is used. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Biogeochemical Cyclesen_US
dc.titleImpacts of temporal CO 2 and climate trends on the detection of ocean anthropogenic CO 2 accumulationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGoodkin, NF:goodkin@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGoodkin, NF=rp00700en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2010GB004009en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053228534en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053228534&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295261300003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGoodkin, NF=12446578100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLevine, NM=26648859700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDoney, SC=35498837200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWanninkhof, R=7003939856en_US

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