File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Late Cretaceous bioconnections between Indo-Madagascar and Antarctica: refutation of the Gunnerus Ridge causeway hypothesis

TitleLate Cretaceous bioconnections between Indo-Madagascar and Antarctica: refutation of the Gunnerus Ridge causeway hypothesis
Authors
KeywordsAntarctica
Conrad rise
Crocodyliforms
Dinosaurs
Gunnerus ridge
Issue Date2011
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JBI
Citation
Journal of Biogeography, 2011, v. 38 n. 10, p. 1855-1872 How to Cite?
AbstractAim To evaluate the Gunnerus Ridge land-bridge hypothesis, which postulates a Late Cretaceous causeway between eastern Antarctica and southern Madagascar allowing the passage of terrestrial vertebrates. Location Eastern Antarctica, southern Indian Ocean, Madagascar. Methods The review involves palaeogeographical modelling, which draws upon geological and geophysical data, bathymetric charts, and plate tectonic reconstructions, and the evaluation of stratigraphically calibrated phylogenetic analyses to document ghost lineages of select taxa. Results The available geological and geophysical evidence indicates that eastern Antarctica's Gunnerus Ridge and southern Madagascar were separated for the entire Late Cretaceous by a vast marine expanse. In the mid-Late Cretaceous, the gap was probably punctuated by land on two intervening physiographical highs, the northern Madagascar Plateau and Conrad Rise, the latter of which, although probably large, was still separated from Antarctica's Riiser-Larsen Peninsula by c.1600km. Recent, stratigraphically calibrated phylogenies including large, terrestrial end-Cretaceous vertebrate taxa of Madagascar and the Indian subcontinent reveal long ghost lineages that extended into the Early Cretaceous. Main conclusions The view that Antarctica and Madagascar were connected by a long causeway between the Gunnerus Ridge and southern Madagascar in the Late Cretaceous, and that terrestrial vertebrates were able to colonize new frontiers using this physiographical feature, is almost certainly incorrect, as was previously demonstrated for the purported causeway between Antarctica and the Indian subcontinent across the Kerguelen Plateau. Connection across mainland Africa to account for the close relationships of several fossil and extant vertebrate taxa of Indo-Madagascar and South America is another option, although this too lacks credibility. We conclude that (1) throughout the Late Cretaceous there was no intervening, continuous causeway through Antarctica and associated land bridges between South America to the west and Indo-Madagascar to the east; and (2) mid- to large-sized, obligate terrestrial forms (e.g. abelisauroid theropod and titanosaurian sauropod dinosaurs and notosuchian crocodyliforms) gained broad distribution across Gondwanan land masses prior to fragmentation and were isolated on Indo-Madagascar before the end of the Early Cretaceous. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151324
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.997
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.807
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
National Science FoundationEAR-0446488
Funding Information:

J.R.A. is grateful to Graeme Eagles, Karsten Gohl, John Hillier, Dennis Kent, Nicole Parsiegla, Susanne Renner and Joshua Smith for sharing literature and information. D. W. K. acknowledges discussions with Joel Cracraft, Matthew Lamanna, Alan Turner, Jo Whittaker, and others at an August 2010 National Science Foundation-sponsored workshop organized by Dave Barbeau and Ross MacPhee concerned with Southern Hemisphere Late Cretaceous-Eocene bioconnections. He would also like to thank Joseph Sertich for subsequent discussions and both he and Lucille Betti-Nash for assistance in drafting Fig. 6. The National Science Foundation provided financial support to D. W. K. (grant EAR-0446488). We also thank the two anonymous referees, whose insightful comments resulted in revisions that significantly improved the paper.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAli, JRen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrause, DWen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:20:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:20:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Biogeography, 2011, v. 38 n. 10, p. 1855-1872en_US
dc.identifier.issn0305-0270en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151324-
dc.description.abstractAim To evaluate the Gunnerus Ridge land-bridge hypothesis, which postulates a Late Cretaceous causeway between eastern Antarctica and southern Madagascar allowing the passage of terrestrial vertebrates. Location Eastern Antarctica, southern Indian Ocean, Madagascar. Methods The review involves palaeogeographical modelling, which draws upon geological and geophysical data, bathymetric charts, and plate tectonic reconstructions, and the evaluation of stratigraphically calibrated phylogenetic analyses to document ghost lineages of select taxa. Results The available geological and geophysical evidence indicates that eastern Antarctica's Gunnerus Ridge and southern Madagascar were separated for the entire Late Cretaceous by a vast marine expanse. In the mid-Late Cretaceous, the gap was probably punctuated by land on two intervening physiographical highs, the northern Madagascar Plateau and Conrad Rise, the latter of which, although probably large, was still separated from Antarctica's Riiser-Larsen Peninsula by c.1600km. Recent, stratigraphically calibrated phylogenies including large, terrestrial end-Cretaceous vertebrate taxa of Madagascar and the Indian subcontinent reveal long ghost lineages that extended into the Early Cretaceous. Main conclusions The view that Antarctica and Madagascar were connected by a long causeway between the Gunnerus Ridge and southern Madagascar in the Late Cretaceous, and that terrestrial vertebrates were able to colonize new frontiers using this physiographical feature, is almost certainly incorrect, as was previously demonstrated for the purported causeway between Antarctica and the Indian subcontinent across the Kerguelen Plateau. Connection across mainland Africa to account for the close relationships of several fossil and extant vertebrate taxa of Indo-Madagascar and South America is another option, although this too lacks credibility. We conclude that (1) throughout the Late Cretaceous there was no intervening, continuous causeway through Antarctica and associated land bridges between South America to the west and Indo-Madagascar to the east; and (2) mid- to large-sized, obligate terrestrial forms (e.g. abelisauroid theropod and titanosaurian sauropod dinosaurs and notosuchian crocodyliforms) gained broad distribution across Gondwanan land masses prior to fragmentation and were isolated on Indo-Madagascar before the end of the Early Cretaceous. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JBIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biogeographyen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectAntarcticaen_US
dc.subjectConrad riseen_US
dc.subjectCrocodyliformsen_US
dc.subjectDinosaursen_US
dc.subjectGunnerus ridgeen_US
dc.titleLate Cretaceous bioconnections between Indo-Madagascar and Antarctica: refutation of the Gunnerus Ridge causeway hypothesisen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailAli, JR: jrali@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityAli, JR=rp00659en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2699.2011.02546.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052782344en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros198646-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052782344&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume38en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1855en_US
dc.identifier.epage1872en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295052300002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKrause, DW=7202949034en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAli, JR=7102266465en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats