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Article: Mineral ecophysiological data provide growing evidence for microbial activity in banded-iron formations

TitleMineral ecophysiological data provide growing evidence for microbial activity in banded-iron formations
Authors
KeywordsBanded-iron formations
Marine phytoplankton
Microbial activities
Submarine geology
Ecophysiology
Issue Date2011
PublisherGeological Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.geosociety.org/pubs/
Citation
Geology, 2011, v. 39 n. 8, p. 707-710 How to Cite?
AbstractThe phosphorus composition of banded-iron formations (BIFs) has been used as a proxy for Precambrian seawater composition and the paleoeredox state of Earth's surface environment. However, it is unclear whether the phosphorus in BIFs originally entered the sediment as a sorbed component of the iron oxyhydroxide particles, or whether it was incorporated into the biomass of marine phytoplankton. We conducted high-resolution mineral analyses and report here the first detection of an Fe(III) acetate salt, as well as nanocrystals of apatite in association with magnetite, in the 2.48 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (a BIF), Hamersley, Western Australia. The clusters of apatite are similar in size and morphology to biogenic apatite crystals resulting from biomass decay in Phanerozoic marine sediments, while the formation of an Fe(III) acetate salt and magnetite not only implies the original presence of biomass in the BIF sediments, but also that organic carbon likely served as an electron donor during bacterial Fe(III) reduction. This study is important because it suggests that phytoplankton may have played a key role in the transfer of phosphorus (and other trace elements) from the photic zone to the seafloor. © 2011 Geological Society of America.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151318
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.548
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.278
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU703008P
Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Bio-sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of EnergyDE-AC05-00OR22725
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
Funding Information:

Li was supported by the Hong Kong General Research Fund (HKU703008P). Cole was supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Bio-sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy, contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (managed and operated by UT-Battelle, LLC). Konhauser was supported by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada grant.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, YLen_US
dc.contributor.authorKonhauser, KOen_US
dc.contributor.authorCole, DRen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhelps, TJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:20:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:20:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeology, 2011, v. 39 n. 8, p. 707-710en_US
dc.identifier.issn0091-7613en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151318-
dc.description.abstractThe phosphorus composition of banded-iron formations (BIFs) has been used as a proxy for Precambrian seawater composition and the paleoeredox state of Earth's surface environment. However, it is unclear whether the phosphorus in BIFs originally entered the sediment as a sorbed component of the iron oxyhydroxide particles, or whether it was incorporated into the biomass of marine phytoplankton. We conducted high-resolution mineral analyses and report here the first detection of an Fe(III) acetate salt, as well as nanocrystals of apatite in association with magnetite, in the 2.48 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (a BIF), Hamersley, Western Australia. The clusters of apatite are similar in size and morphology to biogenic apatite crystals resulting from biomass decay in Phanerozoic marine sediments, while the formation of an Fe(III) acetate salt and magnetite not only implies the original presence of biomass in the BIF sediments, but also that organic carbon likely served as an electron donor during bacterial Fe(III) reduction. This study is important because it suggests that phytoplankton may have played a key role in the transfer of phosphorus (and other trace elements) from the photic zone to the seafloor. © 2011 Geological Society of America.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherGeological Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.geosociety.org/pubs/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofGeologyen_US
dc.subjectBanded-iron formations-
dc.subjectMarine phytoplankton-
dc.subjectMicrobial activities-
dc.subjectSubmarine geology-
dc.subjectEcophysiology-
dc.titleMineral ecophysiological data provide growing evidence for microbial activity in banded-iron formationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, YL:yiliang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, YL=rp01354en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1130/G32003.1en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-79960609974en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros186818-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-79960609974&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage707en_US
dc.identifier.epage710en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000292824100001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, YL=27171876700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKonhauser, KO=6701782021en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCole, DR=7402514711en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPhelps, TJ=35509444300en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9557931-

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