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Article: Kerguelen plateau and the late cretaceous southern-continent bioconnection hypothesis: Tales from a topographical ocean

TitleKerguelen plateau and the late cretaceous southern-continent bioconnection hypothesis: Tales from a topographical ocean
Authors
KeywordsAbelisaurid dinosaurs
Antarctica
Beelzebufo ampinga
India
Kerguelen Plateau
Landbridge
Late Cretaceous
Madagascar
South America
Sudamericid Gondwanatherian mammals
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JBI
Citation
Journal Of Biogeography, 2009, v. 36 n. 9, p. 1778-1784 How to Cite?
AbstractAim To evaluate rigorously an influential palaeobiogeographical hypothesis which states that in the Late Cretaceous (until c. 80 Ma) the Kerguelen Plateau provided a terrestrial causeway between East Antarctica and India that, in turn, formed part of a longer overland route between South America and Madagascar. Location Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean, East Antarctica, India and Madagascar. Methods Palaeogeographical modelling drawing on geological and geophysical data, bathymetric charts and plate tectonic reconstructions. Results During the Late Cretaceous, only small portions of the present-day Kerguelen Plateau were sub-aerial. Additionally, the plateau's north-north-west and south-south-east ends did not directly abut India and Antarctica, but instead were separated by large gaps. Thus, the notion that the two continents were then linked by a land route running the entire length of the edifice is almost certainly incorrect. Main conclusions The currently available physical evidence indicates that the Late Cretaceous southern-continent connection hypothesis, which is based exclusively on biological data, is untenable. Assuming the fossil and/or extant biological records of Madagascar-India are closely related to those of South America, alternative palaeogeographical scenarios need to be explored to explain this conundrum. Overwater dispersal and/or an alternative passage involving a more direct route via Africa (with crossings of the Mozambique Channel and a then appreciably narrower Central Atlantic) should be considered. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151287
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.997
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.807
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAli, JRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAitchison, JCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:20:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:20:07Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Biogeography, 2009, v. 36 n. 9, p. 1778-1784en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0305-0270en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151287-
dc.description.abstractAim To evaluate rigorously an influential palaeobiogeographical hypothesis which states that in the Late Cretaceous (until c. 80 Ma) the Kerguelen Plateau provided a terrestrial causeway between East Antarctica and India that, in turn, formed part of a longer overland route between South America and Madagascar. Location Southern Ocean, Indian Ocean, East Antarctica, India and Madagascar. Methods Palaeogeographical modelling drawing on geological and geophysical data, bathymetric charts and plate tectonic reconstructions. Results During the Late Cretaceous, only small portions of the present-day Kerguelen Plateau were sub-aerial. Additionally, the plateau's north-north-west and south-south-east ends did not directly abut India and Antarctica, but instead were separated by large gaps. Thus, the notion that the two continents were then linked by a land route running the entire length of the edifice is almost certainly incorrect. Main conclusions The currently available physical evidence indicates that the Late Cretaceous southern-continent connection hypothesis, which is based exclusively on biological data, is untenable. Assuming the fossil and/or extant biological records of Madagascar-India are closely related to those of South America, alternative palaeogeographical scenarios need to be explored to explain this conundrum. Overwater dispersal and/or an alternative passage involving a more direct route via Africa (with crossings of the Mozambique Channel and a then appreciably narrower Central Atlantic) should be considered. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JBIen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Biogeographyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Biogeography. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.subjectAbelisaurid dinosaursen_HK
dc.subjectAntarcticaen_HK
dc.subjectBeelzebufo ampingaen_HK
dc.subjectIndiaen_HK
dc.subjectKerguelen Plateauen_HK
dc.subjectLandbridgeen_HK
dc.subjectLate Cretaceousen_HK
dc.subjectMadagascaren_HK
dc.subjectSouth Americaen_HK
dc.subjectSudamericid Gondwanatherian mammalsen_HK
dc.titleKerguelen plateau and the late cretaceous southern-continent bioconnection hypothesis: Tales from a topographical oceanen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAli, JR: jrali@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailAitchison, JC: jona@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAli, JR=rp00659en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAitchison, JC=rp00658en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2699.2009.02105.xen_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-69249168011en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros162128-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-69249168011&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1778en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1784en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2699-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269138000014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAli, JR=7102266465en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAitchison, JC=7102533858en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5627795-

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