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Article: The church east and west orienting the Queen Anne Churches, 1711-34

TitleThe church east and west orienting the Queen Anne Churches, 1711-34
Authors
Issue Date2005
Citation
Journal Of The Society Of Architectural Historians, 2005, v. 64 n. 1, p. 56-72+129 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article presents the results of an investigation carried out to determine the orientation of seventeen churches and one church plan that are directly or indirectly associated with the 1711 and 1712 Acts for Building Fifty New Churches (for London). The buildings represent an important episode in the history of western ecclesiastical architecture, the visible manifestation of a Tory government-High Church plan to rekindle a "purer form of Christianity" based on the "primitive churches" of the Near East. Our data indicate that few, if any, of the buildings were aligned using the rising or setting sun on important Christian feast days, the method adopted by many of the medieval church builders. Whether this break with tradition was deliberate or not is a matter for conjecture. Nicholas Hawksmoor seemed particularly keen on getting a "correct" alignment and did so for three of his six sole-author buildings. In fact, we suggest that two of Hawksmoor's churches at St. Anne Limehouse and Christchurch Spitalfields, and James Gibbs's St. Martin-in-the-Fields, were so accurately aligned that the only feasible technique for achieving this was through the use of declination-corrected compasses. We speculate that the scientist Edmond Halley provided information and logistical assistance to Hawksmoor.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151277
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.110
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAli, JRen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCunich, Pen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:19:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:19:54Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The Society Of Architectural Historians, 2005, v. 64 n. 1, p. 56-72+129en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0037-9808en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151277-
dc.description.abstractThis article presents the results of an investigation carried out to determine the orientation of seventeen churches and one church plan that are directly or indirectly associated with the 1711 and 1712 Acts for Building Fifty New Churches (for London). The buildings represent an important episode in the history of western ecclesiastical architecture, the visible manifestation of a Tory government-High Church plan to rekindle a "purer form of Christianity" based on the "primitive churches" of the Near East. Our data indicate that few, if any, of the buildings were aligned using the rising or setting sun on important Christian feast days, the method adopted by many of the medieval church builders. Whether this break with tradition was deliberate or not is a matter for conjecture. Nicholas Hawksmoor seemed particularly keen on getting a "correct" alignment and did so for three of his six sole-author buildings. In fact, we suggest that two of Hawksmoor's churches at St. Anne Limehouse and Christchurch Spitalfields, and James Gibbs's St. Martin-in-the-Fields, were so accurately aligned that the only feasible technique for achieving this was through the use of declination-corrected compasses. We speculate that the scientist Edmond Halley provided information and logistical assistance to Hawksmoor.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the Society of Architectural Historiansen_HK
dc.titleThe church east and west orienting the Queen Anne Churches, 1711-34en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailAli, JR: jrali@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCunich, P: cunich@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityAli, JR=rp00659en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCunich, P=rp01191en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-60950680455en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros97450-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-60950680455&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume64en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage56en_HK
dc.identifier.epage72+129en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAli, JR=7102266465en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCunich, P=9747534800en_HK

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