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Article: Fire and flood management of coastal swamp enabled first rice paddy cultivation in east China

TitleFire and flood management of coastal swamp enabled first rice paddy cultivation in east China
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature
Citation
Nature, 2007, v. 449 n. 7161, p. 459-462 How to Cite?
AbstractThe adoption of cereal cultivation was one of the most important cultural processes in history, marking the transition from hunting and gathering by Mesolithic foragers to the food-producing economy of Neolithic farmers. In the Lower Yangtze region of China, a centre of rice domestication, the timing and system of initial rice cultivation remain unclear. Here we report detailed evidence from Kuahuqiao that reveals the precise cultural and environmental context of rice cultivation at this earliest known Neolithic site in eastern China, 7,700 calibrated years before present (cal. yr bp). Pollen, algal, fungal spore and micro-charcoal data from sediments demonstrate that these Neolithic communities selected lowland swamps for their rice cultivation and settlement, using fire to clear alder-dominated wetland scrub and prepare the site for occupation, then to maintain wet grassland vegetation of paddy type. Regular flooding by slightly brackish water was probably controlled by 'bunding' to maintain crop yields. The site's exploitation ceased when it was overwhelmed by marine inundation 7,550 cal. yr bp. Our results establish that rice cultivation began in coastal wetlands of eastern China, an ecosystem vulnerable to coastal change but of high fertility and productivity, attractions maximized for about two centuries by sustained high levels of cultural management of the environment. ©2007 Nature Publishing Group.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151222
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 38.138
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 21.936
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZong, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorInnes, JBen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:18:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:18:55Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationNature, 2007, v. 449 n. 7161, p. 459-462en_US
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151222-
dc.description.abstractThe adoption of cereal cultivation was one of the most important cultural processes in history, marking the transition from hunting and gathering by Mesolithic foragers to the food-producing economy of Neolithic farmers. In the Lower Yangtze region of China, a centre of rice domestication, the timing and system of initial rice cultivation remain unclear. Here we report detailed evidence from Kuahuqiao that reveals the precise cultural and environmental context of rice cultivation at this earliest known Neolithic site in eastern China, 7,700 calibrated years before present (cal. yr bp). Pollen, algal, fungal spore and micro-charcoal data from sediments demonstrate that these Neolithic communities selected lowland swamps for their rice cultivation and settlement, using fire to clear alder-dominated wetland scrub and prepare the site for occupation, then to maintain wet grassland vegetation of paddy type. Regular flooding by slightly brackish water was probably controlled by 'bunding' to maintain crop yields. The site's exploitation ceased when it was overwhelmed by marine inundation 7,550 cal. yr bp. Our results establish that rice cultivation began in coastal wetlands of eastern China, an ecosystem vulnerable to coastal change but of high fertility and productivity, attractions maximized for about two centuries by sustained high levels of cultural management of the environment. ©2007 Nature Publishing Group.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNatureen_US
dc.subject.meshAgriculture - History - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshArchaeologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshDiatomsen_US
dc.subject.meshDisastersen_US
dc.subject.meshFiresen_US
dc.subject.meshFossilsen_US
dc.subject.meshGeologic Sediments - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHistory, Ancienten_US
dc.subject.meshOryza Sativa - Growth & Development - Historyen_US
dc.subject.meshPlants - Growth & Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshPollenen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshWetlandsen_US
dc.titleFire and flood management of coastal swamp enabled first rice paddy cultivation in east Chinaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZong, Y:yqzong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZong, Y=rp00846en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nature06135en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17898767-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34848893361en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34848893361&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume449en_US
dc.identifier.issue7161en_US
dc.identifier.spage459en_US
dc.identifier.epage462en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1476-4687-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249724800040-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZong, Y=7005203454en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, Z=35209923100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridInnes, JB=7102004815en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, C=20933817200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Z=25651126500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, H=8599896600en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1713682-

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