File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Evolution of the obliquities of the giant planets in encounters during migration

TitleEvolution of the obliquities of the giant planets in encounters during migration
Authors
KeywordsMigration
Origin
Planetary Dynamics
Planetary Formation
Planets
Resonances
Rotational Dynamics
Solar System
Spin-Orbit
Issue Date2007
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/icarus
Citation
Icarus, 2007, v. 190 n. 1, p. 103-109 How to Cite?
AbstractTsiganis et al. [Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R., Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F., 2005. Nature 435, 459-461] have proposed that the current orbital architecture of the outer Solar System could have been established if it was initially compact and Jupiter and Saturn crossed the 2:1 orbital resonance by divergent migration. The crossing led to close encounters among the giant planets, but the orbital eccentricities and inclinations were damped to their current values by interactions with planetesimals. Brunini [Brunini, A., 2006. Nature 440, 1163-1165] has presented widely publicized numerical results showing that the close encounters led to the current obliquities of the giant planets. We present a simple analytic argument which shows that the change in the spin direction of a planet relative to an inertial frame during an encounter between the planets is very small and that the change in the obliquity (which is measured from the orbit normal) is due to the change in the orbital inclination. Since the inclinations are damped by planetesimal interactions on timescales much shorter than the timescales on which the spins precess due to the torques from the Sun, especially for Uranus and Neptune, the obliquities should return to small values if they are small before the encounters. We have performed simulations using the symplectic integrator SyMBA, modified to include spin evolution due to the torques from the Sun and mutual planetary interactions. Our numerical results are consistent with the analytic argument for no significant remnant obliquities. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151211
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.383
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.447
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, MHen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeale, SJen_US
dc.contributor.authorPfahl, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorWard, WRen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:18:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:18:43Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationIcarus, 2007, v. 190 n. 1, p. 103-109en_US
dc.identifier.issn0019-1035en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151211-
dc.description.abstractTsiganis et al. [Tsiganis, K., Gomes, R., Morbidelli, A., Levison, H.F., 2005. Nature 435, 459-461] have proposed that the current orbital architecture of the outer Solar System could have been established if it was initially compact and Jupiter and Saturn crossed the 2:1 orbital resonance by divergent migration. The crossing led to close encounters among the giant planets, but the orbital eccentricities and inclinations were damped to their current values by interactions with planetesimals. Brunini [Brunini, A., 2006. Nature 440, 1163-1165] has presented widely publicized numerical results showing that the close encounters led to the current obliquities of the giant planets. We present a simple analytic argument which shows that the change in the spin direction of a planet relative to an inertial frame during an encounter between the planets is very small and that the change in the obliquity (which is measured from the orbit normal) is due to the change in the orbital inclination. Since the inclinations are damped by planetesimal interactions on timescales much shorter than the timescales on which the spins precess due to the torques from the Sun, especially for Uranus and Neptune, the obliquities should return to small values if they are small before the encounters. We have performed simulations using the symplectic integrator SyMBA, modified to include spin evolution due to the torques from the Sun and mutual planetary interactions. Our numerical results are consistent with the analytic argument for no significant remnant obliquities. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/icarusen_US
dc.relation.ispartofIcarusen_US
dc.subjectMigrationen_US
dc.subjectOriginen_US
dc.subjectPlanetary Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectPlanetary Formationen_US
dc.subjectPlanetsen_US
dc.subjectResonancesen_US
dc.subjectRotational Dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectSolar Systemen_US
dc.subjectSpin-Orbiten_US
dc.titleEvolution of the obliquities of the giant planets in encounters during migrationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, MH:mhlee@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, MH=rp00724en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.icarus.2007.03.005en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34547737591en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34547737591&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume190en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage103en_US
dc.identifier.epage109en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000249025300008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, MH=7409119699en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeale, SJ=6602697819en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPfahl, E=6603304074en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWard, WR=7202733398en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats