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Article: A preliminary analysis of human impacts on sediment discharges from the Yangtze, China, into the sea

TitleA preliminary analysis of human impacts on sediment discharges from the Yangtze, China, into the sea
Authors
KeywordsClimate Changes
Reservoirs
Sand Mining
Sediment Discharge Into The Sea
Soil Erosion
Yangtze River
Issue Date2005
PublisherCoastal Education & Research Foundation, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cerf-jcr.com
Citation
Journal Of Coastal Research, 2005, v. 21 n. 3, p. 515-521 How to Cite?
AbstractSediment discharge from the Yangtze into the sea has decreased rapidly from 481.7 × 106 tons/y (1953-76) to 389.5 × 106 tons/y (1977-2000), without any corresponding decrease in water discharge. In 2001, the sediment discharge from the Yangtze dropped to 276 × 10 6 tons. Human activities and climate changes obviously play a major role for reducing the sediment supply from the upper basin and for increasing the sediment sinks in the mid-lower basin. Sediment budgets in different parts of the Yangtze are estimated according to hydrometric data and other sources. Major physical and anthropogenic processes are examined with respect to their effects on sediment discharge from the Yangtze into the sea. The decrease of sediment supply (-46.8 × 106 tons/y) from the upper Yangtze in the second period accounts for about 50% of the total decrease (-92.2 × 106 tons/y) into the sea, mostly due to the increased sedimentation in reservoirs as well as climatic factors. The other 50% decrease is mostly attributed to increased sand mining in the mid-lower Yangtze and the decreased sediment supply from the Hanjiang River after building the Danjiangkou Reservoir.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151152
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.852
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.672
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXiqing, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorErfeng, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorHongqiang, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorZong, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:17:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:17:43Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Coastal Research, 2005, v. 21 n. 3, p. 515-521en_US
dc.identifier.issn0749-0208en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151152-
dc.description.abstractSediment discharge from the Yangtze into the sea has decreased rapidly from 481.7 × 106 tons/y (1953-76) to 389.5 × 106 tons/y (1977-2000), without any corresponding decrease in water discharge. In 2001, the sediment discharge from the Yangtze dropped to 276 × 10 6 tons. Human activities and climate changes obviously play a major role for reducing the sediment supply from the upper basin and for increasing the sediment sinks in the mid-lower basin. Sediment budgets in different parts of the Yangtze are estimated according to hydrometric data and other sources. Major physical and anthropogenic processes are examined with respect to their effects on sediment discharge from the Yangtze into the sea. The decrease of sediment supply (-46.8 × 106 tons/y) from the upper Yangtze in the second period accounts for about 50% of the total decrease (-92.2 × 106 tons/y) into the sea, mostly due to the increased sedimentation in reservoirs as well as climatic factors. The other 50% decrease is mostly attributed to increased sand mining in the mid-lower Yangtze and the decreased sediment supply from the Hanjiang River after building the Danjiangkou Reservoir.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCoastal Education & Research Foundation, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cerf-jcr.comen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Coastal Researchen_US
dc.subjectClimate Changesen_US
dc.subjectReservoirsen_US
dc.subjectSand Miningen_US
dc.subjectSediment Discharge Into The Seaen_US
dc.subjectSoil Erosionen_US
dc.subjectYangtze Riveren_US
dc.titleA preliminary analysis of human impacts on sediment discharges from the Yangtze, China, into the seaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZong, Y:yqzong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZong, Y=rp00846en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2112/03-0034.1en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-19544383740en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-19544383740&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage515en_US
dc.identifier.epage521en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000229408900012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiqing, C=6505814944en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridErfeng, Z=6505727819en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHongqiang, M=8599769400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZong, Y=7005203454en_US

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