File Download
 
Links for fulltext
(May Require Subscription)
 
Supplementary

Article: Emeishan Basalt Ar-Ar overprint ages define several tectonic events that affected the western Yangtze platform in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic
  • Basic View
  • Metadata View
  • XML View
TitleEmeishan Basalt Ar-Ar overprint ages define several tectonic events that affected the western Yangtze platform in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic
 
AuthorsAli, JR2
Lo, CH1
Thompson, GM2
Song, X2 3
 
KeywordsChina Amalgamation
Collision
Longmen Shan
Tectonic Resetting
 
Issue Date2004
 
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaes
 
CitationJournal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 2004, v. 23 n. 2, p. 163-178 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1367-9120(03)00072-5
 
AbstractAr-Ar whole-rock dating was carried out as part of a detailed stratigraphical investigation of the Emeishan Basalt large igneous province (LIP) in the stratotype area, Sichuan, China. Thirteen (from twenty-one) specimens from three sections yielded reliable reversed isochron and plateau ages (maximum 1σ errors of ≤2.1 and 1.6 m.y., respectively), and form two clusters centered on the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and Early-Late Cretaceous, with a tail spanning 82-40 Ma. However, all are appreciably younger than the magnetobiostratigraphically-constrained late Middle Permian (255-260 Ma) age of the basalts, reflecting varying degrees of thermal resetting during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Recently, Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous ages reported from elsewhere in the LIP have been used to infer a single 40 m.y.-long tectonic episode that affected the western Yangtze Platform. Developing this idea, the new information have been combined with data we hold for other parts of the terrain, and results from three Emeishan LIP Ar-Ar dating studies published during 2002, to give 32 reliable age dates. Three 10-12 m.y. events appear to be recorded in different parts of the province: Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and Early-Late Cretaceous, with a fourth shorter middle Eocene episode (the 40 m.y. Mesozoic episode appears to be a sampling artifact). Following a review of the regional deformation/tectonic features, it is argued that activity related to various phases of deformation in the Longmen Shan Thrust Belt is the most likely cause of resetting. The final suturing of the North and South China blocks may have also been responsible for the Middle Jurassic event. However, the Oligocene-present indentation of India into Asia appears not to have had an impact, possibly due to the large-scale related strike-slip faults that have effectively shielded the LIP/Sichuan Basin. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
ISSN1367-9120
2013 Impact Factor: 2.831
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.475
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1367-9120(03)00072-5
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000220961200002
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorAli, JR
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, CH
 
dc.contributor.authorThompson, GM
 
dc.contributor.authorSong, X
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:17:43Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:17:43Z
 
dc.date.issued2004
 
dc.description.abstractAr-Ar whole-rock dating was carried out as part of a detailed stratigraphical investigation of the Emeishan Basalt large igneous province (LIP) in the stratotype area, Sichuan, China. Thirteen (from twenty-one) specimens from three sections yielded reliable reversed isochron and plateau ages (maximum 1σ errors of ≤2.1 and 1.6 m.y., respectively), and form two clusters centered on the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and Early-Late Cretaceous, with a tail spanning 82-40 Ma. However, all are appreciably younger than the magnetobiostratigraphically-constrained late Middle Permian (255-260 Ma) age of the basalts, reflecting varying degrees of thermal resetting during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Recently, Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous ages reported from elsewhere in the LIP have been used to infer a single 40 m.y.-long tectonic episode that affected the western Yangtze Platform. Developing this idea, the new information have been combined with data we hold for other parts of the terrain, and results from three Emeishan LIP Ar-Ar dating studies published during 2002, to give 32 reliable age dates. Three 10-12 m.y. events appear to be recorded in different parts of the province: Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and Early-Late Cretaceous, with a fourth shorter middle Eocene episode (the 40 m.y. Mesozoic episode appears to be a sampling artifact). Following a review of the regional deformation/tectonic features, it is argued that activity related to various phases of deformation in the Longmen Shan Thrust Belt is the most likely cause of resetting. The final suturing of the North and South China blocks may have also been responsible for the Middle Jurassic event. However, the Oligocene-present indentation of India into Asia appears not to have had an impact, possibly due to the large-scale related strike-slip faults that have effectively shielded the LIP/Sichuan Basin. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 2004, v. 23 n. 2, p. 163-178 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1367-9120(03)00072-5
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1367-9120(03)00072-5
 
dc.identifier.epage178
 
dc.identifier.hkuros90882
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220961200002
 
dc.identifier.issn1367-9120
2013 Impact Factor: 2.831
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.475
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1942473112
 
dc.identifier.spage163
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151151
 
dc.identifier.volume23
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaes
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Asian Earth Sciences
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectChina Amalgamation
 
dc.subjectCollision
 
dc.subjectLongmen Shan
 
dc.subjectTectonic Resetting
 
dc.titleEmeishan Basalt Ar-Ar overprint ages define several tectonic events that affected the western Yangtze platform in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic
 
dc.typeArticle
 
<?xml encoding="utf-8" version="1.0"?>
<item><contributor.author>Ali, JR</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lo, CH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Thompson, GM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Song, X</contributor.author>
<date.accessioned>2012-06-26T06:17:43Z</date.accessioned>
<date.available>2012-06-26T06:17:43Z</date.available>
<date.issued>2004</date.issued>
<identifier.citation>Journal Of Asian Earth Sciences, 2004, v. 23 n. 2, p. 163-178</identifier.citation>
<identifier.issn>1367-9120</identifier.issn>
<identifier.uri>http://hdl.handle.net/10722/151151</identifier.uri>
<description.abstract>Ar-Ar whole-rock dating was carried out as part of a detailed stratigraphical investigation of the Emeishan Basalt large igneous province (LIP) in the stratotype area, Sichuan, China. Thirteen (from twenty-one) specimens from three sections yielded reliable reversed isochron and plateau ages (maximum 1&#963; errors of &#8804;2.1 and 1.6 m.y., respectively), and form two clusters centered on the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and Early-Late Cretaceous, with a tail spanning 82-40 Ma. However, all are appreciably younger than the magnetobiostratigraphically-constrained late Middle Permian (255-260 Ma) age of the basalts, reflecting varying degrees of thermal resetting during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. Recently, Middle Jurassic-Early Cretaceous ages reported from elsewhere in the LIP have been used to infer a single 40 m.y.-long tectonic episode that affected the western Yangtze Platform. Developing this idea, the new information have been combined with data we hold for other parts of the terrain, and results from three Emeishan LIP Ar-Ar dating studies published during 2002, to give 32 reliable age dates. Three 10-12 m.y. events appear to be recorded in different parts of the province: Middle Jurassic, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous and Early-Late Cretaceous, with a fourth shorter middle Eocene episode (the 40 m.y. Mesozoic episode appears to be a sampling artifact). Following a review of the regional deformation/tectonic features, it is argued that activity related to various phases of deformation in the Longmen Shan Thrust Belt is the most likely cause of resetting. The final suturing of the North and South China blocks may have also been responsible for the Middle Jurassic event. However, the Oligocene-present indentation of India into Asia appears not to have had an impact, possibly due to the large-scale related strike-slip faults that have effectively shielded the LIP/Sichuan Basin. &#169; 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</description.abstract>
<language>eng</language>
<publisher>Pergamon. The Journal&apos;s web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaes</publisher>
<relation.ispartof>Journal of Asian Earth Sciences</relation.ispartof>
<subject>China Amalgamation</subject>
<subject>Collision</subject>
<subject>Longmen Shan</subject>
<subject>Tectonic Resetting</subject>
<title>Emeishan Basalt Ar-Ar overprint ages define several tectonic events that affected the western Yangtze platform in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic</title>
<type>Article</type>
<description.nature>Link_to_subscribed_fulltext</description.nature>
<identifier.doi>10.1016/S1367-9120(03)00072-5</identifier.doi>
<identifier.scopus>eid_2-s2.0-1942473112</identifier.scopus>
<identifier.hkuros>90882</identifier.hkuros>
<relation.references>http://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1942473112&amp;selection=ref&amp;src=s&amp;origin=recordpage</relation.references>
<identifier.volume>23</identifier.volume>
<identifier.issue>2</identifier.issue>
<identifier.spage>163</identifier.spage>
<identifier.epage>178</identifier.epage>
<identifier.isi>WOS:000220961200002</identifier.isi>
<publisher.place>United Kingdom</publisher.place>
</item>
Author Affiliations
  1. National Taiwan University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. Chengdu University of Technology