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Article: High-latitude influence on the eastern equatorial Pacific climate in the early Pleistocene epoch

TitleHigh-latitude influence on the eastern equatorial Pacific climate in the early Pleistocene epoch
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature
Citation
Nature, 2004, v. 427 n. 6976, p. 720-723 How to Cite?
AbstractMany records of tropical sea surface temperature and marine productivity exhibit cycles of 23 kyr (orbital precession) and 100 kyr during the past 0.5 Myr (refs 1-5), whereas high-latitude sea surface temperature records display much more pronounced obliquity cycles at a period of about 41 kyr (ref. 6). Little is known, however, about tropical climate variability before the mid-Pleistocene transition about 900 kyr ago, which marks the change from a climate dominated by 41-kyr cycles (when ice-age cycles and high-latitude sea surface temperature variations were dictated by changes in the Earth's obliquity) to the more recent 100-kyr cycles of ice ages. Here we analyse alkenones from marine sediments in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean to reconstruct sea surface temperatures and marine productivity over the past 1.8 Myr. We find that both records are dominated by the 41-kyr obliquity cycles between 1.8 and 1.2 Myr ago, with a relatively small contribution from orbital precession, and that early Pleistocene sea surface temperatures varied in the opposite sense to local annual insolation in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. We conclude that during the early Pleistocene epoch, climate variability at our study site must have been determined by high-latitude processes that were driven by orbital obliquity forcing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151137
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 38.138
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 21.936
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Zen_US
dc.contributor.authorHerbert, TOen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:17:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:17:34Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationNature, 2004, v. 427 n. 6976, p. 720-723en_US
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151137-
dc.description.abstractMany records of tropical sea surface temperature and marine productivity exhibit cycles of 23 kyr (orbital precession) and 100 kyr during the past 0.5 Myr (refs 1-5), whereas high-latitude sea surface temperature records display much more pronounced obliquity cycles at a period of about 41 kyr (ref. 6). Little is known, however, about tropical climate variability before the mid-Pleistocene transition about 900 kyr ago, which marks the change from a climate dominated by 41-kyr cycles (when ice-age cycles and high-latitude sea surface temperature variations were dictated by changes in the Earth's obliquity) to the more recent 100-kyr cycles of ice ages. Here we analyse alkenones from marine sediments in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean to reconstruct sea surface temperatures and marine productivity over the past 1.8 Myr. We find that both records are dominated by the 41-kyr obliquity cycles between 1.8 and 1.2 Myr ago, with a relatively small contribution from orbital precession, and that early Pleistocene sea surface temperatures varied in the opposite sense to local annual insolation in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. We conclude that during the early Pleistocene epoch, climate variability at our study site must have been determined by high-latitude processes that were driven by orbital obliquity forcing.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNatureen_US
dc.subject.meshAlkenes - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshClimateen_US
dc.subject.meshEukaryota - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshGeologic Sediments - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshIceen_US
dc.subject.meshMarine Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPacific Oceanen_US
dc.subject.meshSeawater - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshTemperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.titleHigh-latitude influence on the eastern equatorial Pacific climate in the early Pleistocene epochen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLiu, Z:zhliu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, Z=rp00750en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nature02338en_US
dc.identifier.pmid14973481-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1442280717en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1442280717&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume427en_US
dc.identifier.issue6976en_US
dc.identifier.spage720en_US
dc.identifier.epage723en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000189026000039-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, Z=16177844800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHerbert, TO=7005866440en_US

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