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Article: Carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations associated with dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria

TitleCarbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations associated with dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria
Authors
KeywordsBiogenic Siderite
Carbon Isotopes
Hydrogen Isotopes
Iron-Reducing Bacteria
Issue Date2003
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemgeo
Citation
Chemical Geology, 2003, v. 195 n. 1-4, p. 5-16 How to Cite?
AbstractShewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32 and Shewanella algae strain BrY were grown in laboratory cultures at 30 °C to characterize carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation patterns related to the growth of iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric citrate or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was provided as the electron acceptor and lactate or H 2 (balanced with CO 2) was used as the electron donor. Because these bacteria are not known to grow chemoautotrophically, yeast extract was provided as a carbon source when cultures were grown on H 2/CO 2. Siderite formed only when HFO was used as the electron acceptor, possibly because of chelation of ferrous iron with dissolved citrate when ferric citrate was used as the electron acceptor. Carbon isotope enrichment factors for the siderite-CO 2 system (ε sid-CO 2) ranged from 13.3‰ to 14.5‰ when lactate was used as the carbon and energy source, which were consistent with theoretical calculations of equilibrium isotope fractionation (α sid-CO 2) for the siderite-CO 2 system [Geochim. Int. 18 (1981) 85]. In experiments using H 2/CO 2 as the energy source and yeast extract as the carbon source, carbon isotope enrichment factors were relatively low (0.5‰ to 7.4‰). The potential exists that a kinetic effect related to siderite precipitation rate influenced isotope partitioning or a dynamic balance was established between carbon sinks (i.e. biomass and solid carbonate) of diverging carbon isotope composition. A more quantitative estimate of ε sid-CO 2 for biological systems that contain ambient dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) requires a deeper understanding of carbon flow dynamics in these compartmentalized closed systems. Finally, in experiments using H 2/CO 2 as an energy source, the hydrogen isotope composition of head gas H 2 and water were analyzed for D/H ratio. The results indicate that bacterial metabolism potentially facilitates isotope exchange between water and H 2. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151097
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.482
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.346
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRomanek, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, CLen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorHorita, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorVali, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorCole, DRen_US
dc.contributor.authorPhelps, TJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:17:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:17:03Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationChemical Geology, 2003, v. 195 n. 1-4, p. 5-16en_US
dc.identifier.issn0009-2541en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151097-
dc.description.abstractShewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32 and Shewanella algae strain BrY were grown in laboratory cultures at 30 °C to characterize carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation patterns related to the growth of iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric citrate or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was provided as the electron acceptor and lactate or H 2 (balanced with CO 2) was used as the electron donor. Because these bacteria are not known to grow chemoautotrophically, yeast extract was provided as a carbon source when cultures were grown on H 2/CO 2. Siderite formed only when HFO was used as the electron acceptor, possibly because of chelation of ferrous iron with dissolved citrate when ferric citrate was used as the electron acceptor. Carbon isotope enrichment factors for the siderite-CO 2 system (ε sid-CO 2) ranged from 13.3‰ to 14.5‰ when lactate was used as the carbon and energy source, which were consistent with theoretical calculations of equilibrium isotope fractionation (α sid-CO 2) for the siderite-CO 2 system [Geochim. Int. 18 (1981) 85]. In experiments using H 2/CO 2 as the energy source and yeast extract as the carbon source, carbon isotope enrichment factors were relatively low (0.5‰ to 7.4‰). The potential exists that a kinetic effect related to siderite precipitation rate influenced isotope partitioning or a dynamic balance was established between carbon sinks (i.e. biomass and solid carbonate) of diverging carbon isotope composition. A more quantitative estimate of ε sid-CO 2 for biological systems that contain ambient dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) requires a deeper understanding of carbon flow dynamics in these compartmentalized closed systems. Finally, in experiments using H 2/CO 2 as an energy source, the hydrogen isotope composition of head gas H 2 and water were analyzed for D/H ratio. The results indicate that bacterial metabolism potentially facilitates isotope exchange between water and H 2. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemgeoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChemical Geologyen_US
dc.subjectBiogenic Sideriteen_US
dc.subjectCarbon Isotopesen_US
dc.subjectHydrogen Isotopesen_US
dc.subjectIron-Reducing Bacteriaen_US
dc.titleCarbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations associated with dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteriaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, Y:yiliang@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLi, Y=rp01354en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0009-2541(02)00385-6en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037446420en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037446420&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume195en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage5en_US
dc.identifier.epage16en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182179700002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRomanek, CS=6603780398en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, CL=35313221000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, Y=27171876700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHorita, J=24378744500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVali, H=7004175757en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCole, DR=7402514711en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPhelps, TJ=35509444300en_US

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