File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Cenozoic Plate interaction of the Australia and Philippine Sea Plates: "Hit-and-run" tectonics

TitleCenozoic Plate interaction of the Australia and Philippine Sea Plates: "Hit-and-run" tectonics
Authors
KeywordsAustralia
Cenozoic Tectonics
Eurasia
Kinematics
Marginal Basins
New Guinea
Paleomagnetics
Philippines
Sunda Plate
Issue Date2003
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tecto
Citation
Tectonophysics, 2003, v. 363 n. 3-4, p. 181-199 How to Cite?
AbstractRecent studies in northwest New Guinea have shown the presence of at least two marginal basins of different age, both of which formed in back-arc settings. The older basin opened between the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, a remnant of which is now preserved as the New Guinea Ophiolite. Its obduction started at 40 Ma and it was finally emplaced on the Australian margin at ∼ 30 Ma. The younger basin was active during the Oligocene to Middle Miocene and was obducted in the Early Pliocene. Studies of the western edge of the Philippine Sea also reveal an important deformation of the Philippine arc in the Oligocene, which hitherto has remained unexplained. Using information from these systems, paleomagnetic results, kinematic reconstructions and geochemistry of the supra-subduction ophiolite, we present a plate model to explain the region's Eo-Oligocene development. We suggest that an extensive portion of oceanic crust extended the Australian Plate a considerable distance north of the Australian Craton. As Australia began its steady 7-8 cm/year northward drift in the Early Eocene, this lithosphere was subducted. Thus, the portion of the Philippine Sea Plate carrying the Taiwan-Philippine Arc to its present site may have actually been in contact with the ophiolite now in New Guinea and obduction led to deformation of the Philippine Sea Plate itself. Neogene Plate kinematics transported the deformed belt in contact with the Sunda block in the Late Miocene and Pliocene. This interpretation has implications for the origin for the Philippine Sea Plate and the potential incorporation of continental fragments against its boundaries. © 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151096
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.65
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.971
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPubellier, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorAli, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorMonnier, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:17:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:17:02Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationTectonophysics, 2003, v. 363 n. 3-4, p. 181-199en_US
dc.identifier.issn0040-1951en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151096-
dc.description.abstractRecent studies in northwest New Guinea have shown the presence of at least two marginal basins of different age, both of which formed in back-arc settings. The older basin opened between the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, a remnant of which is now preserved as the New Guinea Ophiolite. Its obduction started at 40 Ma and it was finally emplaced on the Australian margin at ∼ 30 Ma. The younger basin was active during the Oligocene to Middle Miocene and was obducted in the Early Pliocene. Studies of the western edge of the Philippine Sea also reveal an important deformation of the Philippine arc in the Oligocene, which hitherto has remained unexplained. Using information from these systems, paleomagnetic results, kinematic reconstructions and geochemistry of the supra-subduction ophiolite, we present a plate model to explain the region's Eo-Oligocene development. We suggest that an extensive portion of oceanic crust extended the Australian Plate a considerable distance north of the Australian Craton. As Australia began its steady 7-8 cm/year northward drift in the Early Eocene, this lithosphere was subducted. Thus, the portion of the Philippine Sea Plate carrying the Taiwan-Philippine Arc to its present site may have actually been in contact with the ophiolite now in New Guinea and obduction led to deformation of the Philippine Sea Plate itself. Neogene Plate kinematics transported the deformed belt in contact with the Sunda block in the Late Miocene and Pliocene. This interpretation has implications for the origin for the Philippine Sea Plate and the potential incorporation of continental fragments against its boundaries. © 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tectoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTectonophysicsen_US
dc.rightsTectonophysics. Copyright © Elsevier BV.-
dc.subjectAustraliaen_US
dc.subjectCenozoic Tectonicsen_US
dc.subjectEurasiaen_US
dc.subjectKinematicsen_US
dc.subjectMarginal Basinsen_US
dc.subjectNew Guineaen_US
dc.subjectPaleomagneticsen_US
dc.subjectPhilippinesen_US
dc.subjectSunda Plateen_US
dc.titleCenozoic Plate interaction of the Australia and Philippine Sea Plates: "Hit-and-run" tectonicsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailAli, J:jrali@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityAli, J=rp00659en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0040-1951(02)00671-6en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037435090en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros80116-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037435090&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume363en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage181en_US
dc.identifier.epage199en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000182291100002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPubellier, M=7003955053en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAli, J=7102266465en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMonnier, C=7004286828en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats