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Article: Human impacts on the Changjiang (Yangtze) River basin, China, with special reference to the impacts on the dry season water discharges into the sea

TitleHuman impacts on the Changjiang (Yangtze) River basin, China, with special reference to the impacts on the dry season water discharges into the sea
Authors
KeywordsFluvial Processes
Interbasin Water Transfer
River Discharge
The Changjiang River
Three Gorges
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/geomorph
Citation
Geomorphology, 2001, v. 41 n. 2, p. 111-123 How to Cite?
AbstractThe annual mean discharge from the upper Changjiang (Yangtze) basin has shown a significant decreasing trend since the end of the 19th century. Since the 1970s, the monthly mean discharge to the sea has also shown a dramatic decrease during dry seasons. This paper examines the human impacts on the major hydrological processes in the Changjiang River basin, with a special focus on their influence on the discharge from the basin to the sea during the dry season. Climatic warming has been obvious since the 1960s in the headwater area, resulting a continuous retreat of glaciers, while the increased evaporation is responsible for the dropping of lake water levels and decrease in water area. Such a trend continuing into the coming decades will significantly change the seasonal hydrological processes, especially the dry-season discharges from the upper basin. The decreasing vegetation cover and the increasing reservoir volume capacity also impacted on the water discharge over the past decades, although in different ways. The possible impacts of the Three Gorges Dam on the monthly variation of water discharge to the sea are discussed with special emphasis. In the middle basin discussions are focused on the effect of decreasing lake area, of increasing reservoir capacity, and of irrigated agriculture on the temporal changes of water discharge since the 1950s. The human impacts on water discharge from the lower basin to the sea are mostly attributed to water transfer to both tributary and neighboring drainage basins by a large number of electric pumping stations and sluices. The total water transferring capacity is more than 5000 m3/s along the lower river. Studies indicate that in a dry season the water discharge to the sea is greatly reduced and results in strong saltwater intrusion in the estuary. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151067
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.813
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.441
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorZong, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorXu, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Sen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:16:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:16:43Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.citationGeomorphology, 2001, v. 41 n. 2, p. 111-123en_US
dc.identifier.issn0169-555Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/151067-
dc.description.abstractThe annual mean discharge from the upper Changjiang (Yangtze) basin has shown a significant decreasing trend since the end of the 19th century. Since the 1970s, the monthly mean discharge to the sea has also shown a dramatic decrease during dry seasons. This paper examines the human impacts on the major hydrological processes in the Changjiang River basin, with a special focus on their influence on the discharge from the basin to the sea during the dry season. Climatic warming has been obvious since the 1960s in the headwater area, resulting a continuous retreat of glaciers, while the increased evaporation is responsible for the dropping of lake water levels and decrease in water area. Such a trend continuing into the coming decades will significantly change the seasonal hydrological processes, especially the dry-season discharges from the upper basin. The decreasing vegetation cover and the increasing reservoir volume capacity also impacted on the water discharge over the past decades, although in different ways. The possible impacts of the Three Gorges Dam on the monthly variation of water discharge to the sea are discussed with special emphasis. In the middle basin discussions are focused on the effect of decreasing lake area, of increasing reservoir capacity, and of irrigated agriculture on the temporal changes of water discharge since the 1950s. The human impacts on water discharge from the lower basin to the sea are mostly attributed to water transfer to both tributary and neighboring drainage basins by a large number of electric pumping stations and sluices. The total water transferring capacity is more than 5000 m3/s along the lower river. Studies indicate that in a dry season the water discharge to the sea is greatly reduced and results in strong saltwater intrusion in the estuary. © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/geomorphen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGeomorphologyen_US
dc.subjectFluvial Processesen_US
dc.subjectInterbasin Water Transferen_US
dc.subjectRiver Dischargeen_US
dc.subjectThe Changjiang Riveren_US
dc.subjectThree Gorgesen_US
dc.titleHuman impacts on the Changjiang (Yangtze) River basin, China, with special reference to the impacts on the dry season water discharges into the seaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZong, Y:yqzong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZong, Y=rp00846en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0169-555X(01)00109-Xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035170485en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035170485&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume41en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage111en_US
dc.identifier.epage123en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000172288400005-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, X=8090484900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZong, Y=7005203454en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, E=7102686869en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, J=15737810800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, S=8143508800en_US

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