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Article: USing sensitivity analysis to assist parameter zonation in ground water flow model

TitleUSing sensitivity analysis to assist parameter zonation in ground water flow model
Authors
Issue Date1996
Citation
Journal Of The American Water Resources Association, 1996, v. 32 n. 1, p. 75-87 How to Cite?
AbstractFor numerical modeling of ground water movement in a real aquifer system, the aquifer is usually divided into hydrogeologically defined zones, each with its own parameter values. The responses of the system, such as head or drawdown, are often available only in some of the zones. The estimated parameters of all the zones are based on the measured response in these limited zones. However, the estimates for some of the zones may be very uncertain, and these zones are therefore not justified by the data. In this paper, an approach is presented to understand which zone may produce uncertain parameter values and should be lumped with its neighbor. This approach is demonstrated using a regional numerical model for pumping test analysis in the Nottinghamshire aquifer, UK. A step-by-step process is used in identifying the aquifer zones and estimating their parameters based on the principle of using the smallest possible numbers of zones and parameters for adequate representation of the drawdown response. After the parameters of each zone are estimated, the sensitivity features of these parameters are examined. The results show that the parameters in one zone can be estimated properly by the drawdown in another zone only when there is significant sensitivity. For transmissivity, sensitivity between zones occurs when there is significant flow between them. For storativity, sufficient sensitivity can occur without large flows between the zones, provided that one zone causes significant drawdown in the other. This idea can be extended to the flow model for a large aquifer system. If the aquifer is divided in such a way that aquifer responses are not sensitive to the parameters in some of the zones, the parameters in those zones cannot be estimated properly and should be lumped into their neighboring zones. In this way, a simple but more reasonable model can be built.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150986
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.659
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.771

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJiao, JJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLerner, DNen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:15:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:15:32Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Water Resources Association, 1996, v. 32 n. 1, p. 75-87en_US
dc.identifier.issn1093-474Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150986-
dc.description.abstractFor numerical modeling of ground water movement in a real aquifer system, the aquifer is usually divided into hydrogeologically defined zones, each with its own parameter values. The responses of the system, such as head or drawdown, are often available only in some of the zones. The estimated parameters of all the zones are based on the measured response in these limited zones. However, the estimates for some of the zones may be very uncertain, and these zones are therefore not justified by the data. In this paper, an approach is presented to understand which zone may produce uncertain parameter values and should be lumped with its neighbor. This approach is demonstrated using a regional numerical model for pumping test analysis in the Nottinghamshire aquifer, UK. A step-by-step process is used in identifying the aquifer zones and estimating their parameters based on the principle of using the smallest possible numbers of zones and parameters for adequate representation of the drawdown response. After the parameters of each zone are estimated, the sensitivity features of these parameters are examined. The results show that the parameters in one zone can be estimated properly by the drawdown in another zone only when there is significant sensitivity. For transmissivity, sensitivity between zones occurs when there is significant flow between them. For storativity, sufficient sensitivity can occur without large flows between the zones, provided that one zone causes significant drawdown in the other. This idea can be extended to the flow model for a large aquifer system. If the aquifer is divided in such a way that aquifer responses are not sensitive to the parameters in some of the zones, the parameters in those zones cannot be estimated properly and should be lumped into their neighboring zones. In this way, a simple but more reasonable model can be built.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Water Resources Associationen_US
dc.titleUSing sensitivity analysis to assist parameter zonation in ground water flow modelen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030087572en_US
dc.identifier.volume32en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage75en_US
dc.identifier.epage87en_US

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