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Article: Origin and motion history of the Philippine Sea Plate

TitleOrigin and motion history of the Philippine Sea Plate
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tecto
Citation
Tectonophysics, 1995, v. 251 n. 1-4, p. 229-250 How to Cite?
AbstractThe Philippine Sea Plate is the one major plate whose Tertiary motion is poorly constrained and whose origin is problematical. Its southern boundary is the Sorong Fault system which is part of a major left-lateral fault system at the northern margin of the Australian plate. The southern part of the plate in eastern Indonesia has been neglected in most syntheses but includes some of the oldest rocks within the plate which are separated from remnant arcs of the Daito Ridge province of the northern Philippine Sea by the West Philippine Central Basin. The east Indonesian islands of the Halmahera-Waigeo region contain a good Mesozoic and Tertiary stratigraphic record indicating a long arc history for the southern part of the plate. New palaeomagnetic data from these islands define two sub-areas: an area forming part of the Philippine Sea Plate north of the Sorong Fault, and an area within the Sorong Fault system. The area north of the fault records a long-term clockwise rotation history whereas that within the fault zone records local rotations interpreted as due to deformation at the plate edge. Rocks of Philippine Sea Plate origin within both areas record similar latitudinal shifts. The rotation of the area north of the Sorong Fault is considered to represent the motion of the southern part of the Philippine Sea Plate. The new data indicate large Tertiary clockwise rotations similar to earlier suggestions for other parts of the plate but record a discontinuous and more complex motion history than previously suggested. For the southern part of the plate there was 40° rotation with northward translation between 0 and 25 Ma, no significant rotation between 25 and 40 Ma, and there was 50° rotation with southward translation between 40 and 50 Ma. We show that the new palaeomagnetic data form part of a single set with earlier palaeomagnetic data from elsewhere in the plate. The translation history of the southern part of the plate in eastern Indonesia can be reconciled with northward motions recorded elsewhere and can be used to determine rotation poles for the plate (15°N, 160°E for the interval 5-25 Ma, and 10°N, 150°E for the interval 40-50 Ma). Reconstructions based on these poles predict that at ∼ 45 Ma the Palau-Kyushu Ridge had a WNW-ESE orientation which is very different from that postulated by many models used to explain the widespread boninite volcanism in the Izu-Bonin-Marians forearc at this time. The long arc history of the southern part of the plate and the reconstructions based on the rotation poles calculated from the palaeomagnetic data favour an origin for the West Philippine Basin by spreading in a backarc basin. © 1995.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150971
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.65
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.971

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHall, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorAli, JRen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, CDen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaker, SJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:15:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:15:22Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_US
dc.identifier.citationTectonophysics, 1995, v. 251 n. 1-4, p. 229-250en_US
dc.identifier.issn0040-1951en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150971-
dc.description.abstractThe Philippine Sea Plate is the one major plate whose Tertiary motion is poorly constrained and whose origin is problematical. Its southern boundary is the Sorong Fault system which is part of a major left-lateral fault system at the northern margin of the Australian plate. The southern part of the plate in eastern Indonesia has been neglected in most syntheses but includes some of the oldest rocks within the plate which are separated from remnant arcs of the Daito Ridge province of the northern Philippine Sea by the West Philippine Central Basin. The east Indonesian islands of the Halmahera-Waigeo region contain a good Mesozoic and Tertiary stratigraphic record indicating a long arc history for the southern part of the plate. New palaeomagnetic data from these islands define two sub-areas: an area forming part of the Philippine Sea Plate north of the Sorong Fault, and an area within the Sorong Fault system. The area north of the fault records a long-term clockwise rotation history whereas that within the fault zone records local rotations interpreted as due to deformation at the plate edge. Rocks of Philippine Sea Plate origin within both areas record similar latitudinal shifts. The rotation of the area north of the Sorong Fault is considered to represent the motion of the southern part of the Philippine Sea Plate. The new data indicate large Tertiary clockwise rotations similar to earlier suggestions for other parts of the plate but record a discontinuous and more complex motion history than previously suggested. For the southern part of the plate there was 40° rotation with northward translation between 0 and 25 Ma, no significant rotation between 25 and 40 Ma, and there was 50° rotation with southward translation between 40 and 50 Ma. We show that the new palaeomagnetic data form part of a single set with earlier palaeomagnetic data from elsewhere in the plate. The translation history of the southern part of the plate in eastern Indonesia can be reconciled with northward motions recorded elsewhere and can be used to determine rotation poles for the plate (15°N, 160°E for the interval 5-25 Ma, and 10°N, 150°E for the interval 40-50 Ma). Reconstructions based on these poles predict that at ∼ 45 Ma the Palau-Kyushu Ridge had a WNW-ESE orientation which is very different from that postulated by many models used to explain the widespread boninite volcanism in the Izu-Bonin-Marians forearc at this time. The long arc history of the southern part of the plate and the reconstructions based on the rotation poles calculated from the palaeomagnetic data favour an origin for the West Philippine Basin by spreading in a backarc basin. © 1995.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tectoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofTectonophysicsen_US
dc.titleOrigin and motion history of the Philippine Sea Plateen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailAli, JR:jrali@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityAli, JR=rp00659en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029475243en_US
dc.identifier.volume251en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage229en_US
dc.identifier.epage250en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHall, R=7404722084en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAli, JR=7102266465en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAnderson, CD=16057927600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaker, SJ=7403307527en_US

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