File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The character and significance of basement rocks of the southern Molucca Sea region

TitleThe character and significance of basement rocks of the southern Molucca Sea region
Authors
Issue Date1991
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaes
Citation
Journal Of Southeast Asian Earth Sciences, 1991, v. 6 n. 3-4, p. 249-258 How to Cite?
AbstractPre-Neogene basement rocks in the southern Molucca Sea region include ophiolitic rocks, arc volcanic rocks and continental rocks. The ophiolitic complexes are associated with arc and forearc igneous and sedimentary rocks. They are interpreted as the oldest parts of the Philippine Sea Plate with equivalents in the ridges and plateaux of the northern Philippine Sea. In the Molucca Sea region igneous components include rocks with a "supra-subduction zone" character, bonintic volcanic rocks and basic volcanic rocks with a "within-plate" character; "MORB-type" rocks are rare or absent. The ophiolitic rocks are overlain by Upper Cretaceous and Eocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks. Plutonic rocks of island arc origin which intrude the ophiolites yield Late Cretaceous radiometric ages and amphibolites with ophiolitic protoliths yield Eocene ages. The "supra-subduction zone" ophiolites are speculated to have originated during a mid-Cretaceous plate reorganization event. For the Late Cretaceous and Eocene the present-day Marianas arc and forearc provides an attractive model. Volcanic rocks from the basement of Morotai, western Halmahera and much of Bacan. These also have an island arc character and are probably of Late Cretaceous-Paleogene age. Both the arc volcanic rocks and the ophiolitic complexes are overlain by shallow water Eocene limestones and an Oligocene rift sequence including basaltic pillow lavas and volcaniclastic turbidites. The distribution of the Eocene-Oligocene sequences indicate pre-Mid/Late Eocene amalgamation of the ophiolitic and arc terranes. Mid Eocene-Oligocene extension appears to be synchronous with opening of the central West Philippine Basin. Continental crust probably arrived in this region in the Late Paleogene-Early Neogene, either due to collision of the Australian margin with Pacific arc-ophiolite terranes or by terrane movement along the Sorong Fault Zone. © 1992.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150953
ISSN
1998 Impact Factor: 0.303

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHall, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorBallantyne, Pen_US
dc.contributor.authorCharlton, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorAli, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:15:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:15:11Z-
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Southeast Asian Earth Sciences, 1991, v. 6 n. 3-4, p. 249-258en_US
dc.identifier.issn0743-9547en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150953-
dc.description.abstractPre-Neogene basement rocks in the southern Molucca Sea region include ophiolitic rocks, arc volcanic rocks and continental rocks. The ophiolitic complexes are associated with arc and forearc igneous and sedimentary rocks. They are interpreted as the oldest parts of the Philippine Sea Plate with equivalents in the ridges and plateaux of the northern Philippine Sea. In the Molucca Sea region igneous components include rocks with a "supra-subduction zone" character, bonintic volcanic rocks and basic volcanic rocks with a "within-plate" character; "MORB-type" rocks are rare or absent. The ophiolitic rocks are overlain by Upper Cretaceous and Eocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks. Plutonic rocks of island arc origin which intrude the ophiolites yield Late Cretaceous radiometric ages and amphibolites with ophiolitic protoliths yield Eocene ages. The "supra-subduction zone" ophiolites are speculated to have originated during a mid-Cretaceous plate reorganization event. For the Late Cretaceous and Eocene the present-day Marianas arc and forearc provides an attractive model. Volcanic rocks from the basement of Morotai, western Halmahera and much of Bacan. These also have an island arc character and are probably of Late Cretaceous-Paleogene age. Both the arc volcanic rocks and the ophiolitic complexes are overlain by shallow water Eocene limestones and an Oligocene rift sequence including basaltic pillow lavas and volcaniclastic turbidites. The distribution of the Eocene-Oligocene sequences indicate pre-Mid/Late Eocene amalgamation of the ophiolitic and arc terranes. Mid Eocene-Oligocene extension appears to be synchronous with opening of the central West Philippine Basin. Continental crust probably arrived in this region in the Late Paleogene-Early Neogene, either due to collision of the Australian margin with Pacific arc-ophiolite terranes or by terrane movement along the Sorong Fault Zone. © 1992.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jseaesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Southeast Asian Earth Sciencesen_US
dc.titleThe character and significance of basement rocks of the southern Molucca Sea regionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailAli, J:jrali@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityAli, J=rp00659en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026307281en_US
dc.identifier.volume6en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_US
dc.identifier.spage249en_US
dc.identifier.epage258en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHall, R=7404722084en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNichols, G=35612390400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBallantyne, P=6701755245en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCharlton, T=12807122000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAli, J=7102266465en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats