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Article: Development of the North China Craton during the Late Archaean and its Final Amalgamation at 1.8 Ga: Some Speculations on its Position Within a Global Palaeoproterozoic Supercontinent

TitleDevelopment of the North China Craton during the Late Archaean and its Final Amalgamation at 1.8 Ga: Some Speculations on its Position Within a Global Palaeoproterozoic Supercontinent
Authors
Keywords1.8 Ga Collision Event
North China Craton
Palaeoproterozoic
Supercontinents
Issue Date2002
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcr
Citation
Gondwana Research, 2002, v. 5 n. 1, p. 85-94 How to Cite?
AbstractNew data obtained over the past few years indicate that, by the end of the Archaean, the North China Craton consisted of two major crustal entities, identified as the eastern and western blocks. The formation of island and magmatic arcs along the western margin of the eastern block record the latest Archaean events so far identified. The location of the western block at this time is unknown, however, the occurrence of Palaeoproterozoic passive margin sediments, similar in age to those occurring in the eastern block, indicates essentially similar conditions and possible separation by an ocean of unknown dimensions. Re-initiation of east-dipping subduction beneath the western margin of the eastern block resulted in closure of this Palaeoproterozoic ocean, bringing the western block into dose proximity. Continued subduction resulted in a major continental-continental collision and the western margin of the eastern block was again reactivated, leading to extensive thrusting, high-pressure metamorphism and the generation of crustal melts. This occurred between 1.88 and 1.79 Ga ago, resulting in the formation of the Trans-North China Orogen and final amalgamation of the North China Craton. Although information is sparse to non-existent, we have reviewed the possible location of the North China Craton at the time of collision and note a similarity in terms of age, lithology and distribution of major crustal components between the North China Craton and Baltica. Although speculative, we present this model in the hope that it will stimulate debate and lead to further research in these areas.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150931
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.743
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.949
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWilde, SAen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSun, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:15:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:15:01Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationGondwana Research, 2002, v. 5 n. 1, p. 85-94en_US
dc.identifier.issn1342-937Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150931-
dc.description.abstractNew data obtained over the past few years indicate that, by the end of the Archaean, the North China Craton consisted of two major crustal entities, identified as the eastern and western blocks. The formation of island and magmatic arcs along the western margin of the eastern block record the latest Archaean events so far identified. The location of the western block at this time is unknown, however, the occurrence of Palaeoproterozoic passive margin sediments, similar in age to those occurring in the eastern block, indicates essentially similar conditions and possible separation by an ocean of unknown dimensions. Re-initiation of east-dipping subduction beneath the western margin of the eastern block resulted in closure of this Palaeoproterozoic ocean, bringing the western block into dose proximity. Continued subduction resulted in a major continental-continental collision and the western margin of the eastern block was again reactivated, leading to extensive thrusting, high-pressure metamorphism and the generation of crustal melts. This occurred between 1.88 and 1.79 Ga ago, resulting in the formation of the Trans-North China Orogen and final amalgamation of the North China Craton. Although information is sparse to non-existent, we have reviewed the possible location of the North China Craton at the time of collision and note a similarity in terms of age, lithology and distribution of major crustal components between the North China Craton and Baltica. Although speculative, we present this model in the hope that it will stimulate debate and lead to further research in these areas.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcren_US
dc.relation.ispartofGondwana Researchen_US
dc.subject1.8 Ga Collision Eventen_US
dc.subjectNorth China Cratonen_US
dc.subjectPalaeoproterozoicen_US
dc.subjectSupercontinentsen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of the North China Craton during the Late Archaean and its Final Amalgamation at 1.8 Ga: Some Speculations on its Position Within a Global Palaeoproterozoic Supercontinenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhao, G: gzhao@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailSun, M: minsun@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhao, G=rp00842en_US
dc.identifier.authoritySun, M=rp00780en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0001908434en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros72223-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0001908434&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume5en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage85en_US
dc.identifier.epage94en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWilde, SA=35254758600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhao, G=7403296321en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, M=25932315800en_US

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