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Article: Intra-cranial metastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

TitleIntra-cranial metastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor
Authors
KeywordsGastrointestinal Stromal Tumor
Imatinib
Intracranial Metastasis
Issue Date2011
PublisherChinese Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cmj.org/
Citation
Chinese Medical Journal, 2011, v. 124 n. 21, p. 3595-3597 How to Cite?
AbstractWith the evolution of immunochemical staining techniques and better imaging modalities with better image resolution and whole body coverage, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract, is often encountered in clinical practice. Metastasis is common with malignant GIST and can be found in up to 50% of patients at presentation. Liver and peritoneum are the two most common sites of metastasis and accounted for 95% of cases. Lymphatics, bone and lung metastasis are rare. Malignant GIST with intracranial metastasis is even rarer, with only a few cases reported in the literature, and most of these had earlier metastasis elsewhere. Radiological features for GISTs are not specific but it does contribute to confirming early and accurate diagnosis of malignant GISTs by judging the tumor size, enhancement pattern and the invasion of adjacent structures. We report a case of a 26-year-old male with metastatic GIST to the liver and subsequently to the brain and skull vault. This is the first case reported in our locality and he is the youngest patient reported with this disease entity. The clinical progress, radiological features and the role of imaging will be discussed further in this paper. The radiological and clinical features of the primary tumor will specifically be addressed. The purpose of this paper is to enrich the current database of this rare disease entity and to alert both radiologists and clinicians about the imaging features of GIST with intracranial metastasis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150923
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.957
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.428
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChu, YCen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:14:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:14:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationChinese Medical Journal, 2011, v. 124 n. 21, p. 3595-3597en_US
dc.identifier.issn0366-6999en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150923-
dc.description.abstractWith the evolution of immunochemical staining techniques and better imaging modalities with better image resolution and whole body coverage, gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), the most common mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract, is often encountered in clinical practice. Metastasis is common with malignant GIST and can be found in up to 50% of patients at presentation. Liver and peritoneum are the two most common sites of metastasis and accounted for 95% of cases. Lymphatics, bone and lung metastasis are rare. Malignant GIST with intracranial metastasis is even rarer, with only a few cases reported in the literature, and most of these had earlier metastasis elsewhere. Radiological features for GISTs are not specific but it does contribute to confirming early and accurate diagnosis of malignant GISTs by judging the tumor size, enhancement pattern and the invasion of adjacent structures. We report a case of a 26-year-old male with metastatic GIST to the liver and subsequently to the brain and skull vault. This is the first case reported in our locality and he is the youngest patient reported with this disease entity. The clinical progress, radiological features and the role of imaging will be discussed further in this paper. The radiological and clinical features of the primary tumor will specifically be addressed. The purpose of this paper is to enrich the current database of this rare disease entity and to alert both radiologists and clinicians about the imaging features of GIST with intracranial metastasis.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherChinese Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.cmj.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofChinese Medical Journalen_US
dc.subjectGastrointestinal Stromal Tumoren_US
dc.subjectImatiniben_US
dc.subjectIntracranial Metastasisen_US
dc.titleIntra-cranial metastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumoren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, CS:drcswong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CS=rp01391en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3760/cma.j.issn.0366-6999.2011.21.029en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22340184-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-82255195534en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros191843-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-82255195534&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume124en_US
dc.identifier.issue21en_US
dc.identifier.spage3595en_US
dc.identifier.epage3597en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297658200030-
dc.publisher.placeChinaen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CS=24605454100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChu, YC=7403050830en_US

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