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Article: Radiation dose and cancer risk in retrospectively and prospectively ECG-gated coronary angiography using 64-slice multidetector CT

TitleRadiation dose and cancer risk in retrospectively and prospectively ECG-gated coronary angiography using 64-slice multidetector CT
Authors
Issue Date2010
PublisherBritish Institute of Radiology - BJR. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjr.birjournals.org
Citation
British Journal Of Radiology, 2010, v. 83 n. 986, p. 152-158 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study aimed to estimate the radiation dose and cancer risk to adults in England, the USA and Hong Kong associated with retrospectively and prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) using currently practised protocols in Hong Kong. The doses were simulated using the ImPACT spreadsheet. For retrospectively ECG-gated CTAwith pitches of 0.2, 0.22 and 0.24, the effective doseswere 27.7, 23.6 and 20.7 mSv, respectively, formales and 23.6, 20.0 and 18.8 mSv, respectively, for females. For prospectively ECG-gated CTA, the effective dose was 3.7 mSv for both males and females. A table of lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of cancer incidence was set up for the English population for the purpose of estimating cancer risk induced by low-dose radiation exposure, as previously reported for US and Hong Kong populations. From the tables, the LAR of cancer incidence for a representative 50-year-old subject was calculated for retrospectively ECG-gated CTA to be 0.112% and 0.227% for English males and females, respectively, 0.103%and 0.228%for USmales and females, respectively, and was comparatively higher at 0.137% and 0.370% for Hong Kong males and females, respectively; for prospectively ECG-gated CTA, the corresponding values were calculated to be 0.014% and 0.035% for English males and females, respectively, and 0.013%and 0.036%for US males and females, respectively, and againwere higher at 0.017%and 0.060% for Hong Kongmales and females, respectively. Our study shows that prospectively ECG-gated CTA reduces radiation dose and cancer risks by up to 87% compared with retrospectively ECG-gated CTA. © 2010 The British Institute of Radiology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150917
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.84
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.834
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaw, MWMen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorShen, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:14:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:14:25Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Radiology, 2010, v. 83 n. 986, p. 152-158en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150917-
dc.description.abstractThis study aimed to estimate the radiation dose and cancer risk to adults in England, the USA and Hong Kong associated with retrospectively and prospectively electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) using currently practised protocols in Hong Kong. The doses were simulated using the ImPACT spreadsheet. For retrospectively ECG-gated CTAwith pitches of 0.2, 0.22 and 0.24, the effective doseswere 27.7, 23.6 and 20.7 mSv, respectively, formales and 23.6, 20.0 and 18.8 mSv, respectively, for females. For prospectively ECG-gated CTA, the effective dose was 3.7 mSv for both males and females. A table of lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of cancer incidence was set up for the English population for the purpose of estimating cancer risk induced by low-dose radiation exposure, as previously reported for US and Hong Kong populations. From the tables, the LAR of cancer incidence for a representative 50-year-old subject was calculated for retrospectively ECG-gated CTA to be 0.112% and 0.227% for English males and females, respectively, 0.103%and 0.228%for USmales and females, respectively, and was comparatively higher at 0.137% and 0.370% for Hong Kong males and females, respectively; for prospectively ECG-gated CTA, the corresponding values were calculated to be 0.014% and 0.035% for English males and females, respectively, and 0.013%and 0.036%for US males and females, respectively, and againwere higher at 0.017%and 0.060% for Hong Kongmales and females, respectively. Our study shows that prospectively ECG-gated CTA reduces radiation dose and cancer risks by up to 87% compared with retrospectively ECG-gated CTA. © 2010 The British Institute of Radiology.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBritish Institute of Radiology - BJR. The Journal's web site is located at http://bjr.birjournals.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Radiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshCardiac-Gated Imaging Techniques - Adverse Effects - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshCoronary Angiography - Adverse Effects - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiationen_US
dc.subject.meshEngland - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisteden_US
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_US
dc.subject.meshLife Tablesen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Radiation-Induced - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPractice Guidelines As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosageen_US
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessmenten_US
dc.subject.meshSex Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshUnited States - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten_US
dc.titleRadiation dose and cancer risk in retrospectively and prospectively ECG-gated coronary angiography using 64-slice multidetector CTen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKhong, PL:plkhong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKhong, PL=rp00467en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/bjr/29879495en_US
dc.identifier.pmid20139263-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3473541-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-76149122126en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros162137-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-76149122126&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume83en_US
dc.identifier.issue986en_US
dc.identifier.spage152en_US
dc.identifier.epage158en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000275503000016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, B=36087446500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, J=36087521800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, MWM=8663654000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, J=36088100700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShen, Y=7404767110en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhong, PL=7006693233en_US

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