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Article: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Relationship between Radiologic and Clinical Parameters
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TitleSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Relationship between Radiologic and Clinical Parameters
 
AuthorsOoi, CGC1
Khong, PL1
Lam, B1
Ho, JCM1
Yiu, WC2
Wong, WM1
Wang, T1
Ho, PL1
Wong, PC1
Chan, RH1
Lam, WK1
Lai, KN1
Tsang, KWT1
 
KeywordsLung, infection
Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
 
Issue Date2003
 
PublisherRadiological Society of North America, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://radiology.rsnajnls.org
 
CitationRadiology, 2003, v. 229 n. 2, p. 492-499 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2292030736
 
AbstractPURPOSE: To quantify severity of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on chest radiographs and to determine its relationship with clinical parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty patients (mean age, 42.90 years ± 14.01 [SD]; median age, 41.5 years; age range, 25-82 years) with clinically diagnosed SARS were evaluated. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, temperature, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were recorded daily. Severity of lung changes on chest radiographs was scored according to percentage of involved lung. Radiographic scores at days of admission, treatment, and maximal radiographic score were extracted for statistical analysis with clinical parameters. Time to maximal radiographic score from admission and days between onset and beginning of treatment were determined. Correlations between radiographic and clinical parameters were evaluated with Spearman rank correlation. Sex differences with respect to clinical and radiographic parameters were evaluated with Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: Median chest radiographic scores peaked 5 days after beginning of treatment before they declined. Maximal and treatment radiographic scores were inversely related to oxygen saturation (r = -0.67, P < .001; r = -0.35, P = .03). Admission radiographic score was correlated with admission AST level (r = 0.53, P = .003); treatment radiographic score, with treatment ALT and AST levels (r = 0.43, P = .007; r = 0.42, P = .019); and time to maximal radiographic score, with AST level at maximal radiographic score (r = -0.45, P = .006), admission radiographic score (r = -0.55, P < .001), treatment radiographic score (r = -0.58, P < .001), and admission ALT and AST levels (r = -0.44, P = .007; r = -0.58, P = .001). Treatment delay was associated with AST level at maximal radiographic score (r = 0.53, P = .001), treatment radiographic score (r = 0.60, P < .001), and time to maximal radiographic score (r = -0.36, P = .02). No sex differences occurred with respect to radiographic and clinical parameters (P > .05). CONCLUSION: Severity of lung abnormalities quantified on chest radiographs correlates with clinical and laboratory parameters. © RSNA, 2003.
 
ISSN0033-8419
2013 Impact Factor: 6.214
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2292030736
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000186169700029
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorOoi, CGC
 
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, B
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, JCM
 
dc.contributor.authorYiu, WC
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WM
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, T
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, PC
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, RH
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorLai, KN
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KWT
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:13:52Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:13:52Z
 
dc.date.issued2003
 
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To quantify severity of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on chest radiographs and to determine its relationship with clinical parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty patients (mean age, 42.90 years ± 14.01 [SD]; median age, 41.5 years; age range, 25-82 years) with clinically diagnosed SARS were evaluated. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, temperature, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were recorded daily. Severity of lung changes on chest radiographs was scored according to percentage of involved lung. Radiographic scores at days of admission, treatment, and maximal radiographic score were extracted for statistical analysis with clinical parameters. Time to maximal radiographic score from admission and days between onset and beginning of treatment were determined. Correlations between radiographic and clinical parameters were evaluated with Spearman rank correlation. Sex differences with respect to clinical and radiographic parameters were evaluated with Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: Median chest radiographic scores peaked 5 days after beginning of treatment before they declined. Maximal and treatment radiographic scores were inversely related to oxygen saturation (r = -0.67, P < .001; r = -0.35, P = .03). Admission radiographic score was correlated with admission AST level (r = 0.53, P = .003); treatment radiographic score, with treatment ALT and AST levels (r = 0.43, P = .007; r = 0.42, P = .019); and time to maximal radiographic score, with AST level at maximal radiographic score (r = -0.45, P = .006), admission radiographic score (r = -0.55, P < .001), treatment radiographic score (r = -0.58, P < .001), and admission ALT and AST levels (r = -0.44, P = .007; r = -0.58, P = .001). Treatment delay was associated with AST level at maximal radiographic score (r = 0.53, P = .001), treatment radiographic score (r = 0.60, P < .001), and time to maximal radiographic score (r = -0.36, P = .02). No sex differences occurred with respect to radiographic and clinical parameters (P > .05). CONCLUSION: Severity of lung abnormalities quantified on chest radiographs correlates with clinical and laboratory parameters. © RSNA, 2003.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationRadiology, 2003, v. 229 n. 2, p. 492-499 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2292030736
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2292030736
 
dc.identifier.epage499
 
dc.identifier.hkuros87540
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000186169700029
 
dc.identifier.issn0033-8419
2013 Impact Factor: 6.214
 
dc.identifier.issue2
 
dc.identifier.pmid14526098
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0142179002
 
dc.identifier.spage492
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150883
 
dc.identifier.volume229
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRadiological Society of North America, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://radiology.rsnajnls.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofRadiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshAged
 
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Over
 
dc.subject.meshAlanine Transaminase - Blood
 
dc.subject.meshAspartate Aminotransferases - Blood
 
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers - Blood
 
dc.subject.meshBody Temperature
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHeart Rate
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLung - Radiography
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshOxygen - Blood
 
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Diagnosis - Radiography - Therapy
 
dc.subjectLung, infection
 
dc.subjectSevere acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)
 
dc.titleSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome: Relationship between Radiologic and Clinical Parameters
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Khong, PL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, B</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, JCM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Yiu, WC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, WM</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wang, T</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Ho, PL</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, PC</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Chan, RH</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, WK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lai, KN</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsang, KWT</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>PURPOSE: To quantify severity of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on chest radiographs and to determine its relationship with clinical parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty patients (mean age, 42.90 years &#177; 14.01 [SD]; median age, 41.5 years; age range, 25-82 years) with clinically diagnosed SARS were evaluated. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, temperature, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels were recorded daily. Severity of lung changes on chest radiographs was scored according to percentage of involved lung. Radiographic scores at days of admission, treatment, and maximal radiographic score were extracted for statistical analysis with clinical parameters. Time to maximal radiographic score from admission and days between onset and beginning of treatment were determined. Correlations between radiographic and clinical parameters were evaluated with Spearman rank correlation. Sex differences with respect to clinical and radiographic parameters were evaluated with Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: Median chest radiographic scores peaked 5 days after beginning of treatment before they declined. Maximal and treatment radiographic scores were inversely related to oxygen saturation (r = -0.67, P &lt; .001; r = -0.35, P = .03). Admission radiographic score was correlated with admission AST level (r = 0.53, P = .003); treatment radiographic score, with treatment ALT and AST levels (r = 0.43, P = .007; r = 0.42, P = .019); and time to maximal radiographic score, with AST level at maximal radiographic score (r = -0.45, P = .006), admission radiographic score (r = -0.55, P &lt; .001), treatment radiographic score (r = -0.58, P &lt; .001), and admission ALT and AST levels (r = -0.44, P = .007; r = -0.58, P = .001). Treatment delay was associated with AST level at maximal radiographic score (r = 0.53, P = .001), treatment radiographic score (r = 0.60, P &lt; .001), and time to maximal radiographic score (r = -0.36, P = .02). No sex differences occurred with respect to radiographic and clinical parameters (P &gt; .05). CONCLUSION: Severity of lung abnormalities quantified on chest radiographs correlates with clinical and laboratory parameters. &#169; RSNA, 2003.</description.abstract>
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<subject.mesh>Aspartate Aminotransferases - Blood</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Biological Markers - Blood</subject.mesh>
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<subject.mesh>Male</subject.mesh>
<subject.mesh>Middle Aged</subject.mesh>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Mary Hospital Hong Kong