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Article: High-resolution CT quantification of bronchiectasis: Clinical and functional correlation
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TitleHigh-resolution CT quantification of bronchiectasis: Clinical and functional correlation
 
AuthorsOoi, GC1
Khong, PL1
ChanYeung, M1
Ho, JCM1
Chan, PKS1
Lee, JCK1
Lam, WK1
Tsang, KWT1
 
KeywordsBronchiectasis
Lung, CT
 
Issue Date2002
 
PublisherRadiological Society of North America, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://radiology.rsnajnls.org
 
CitationRadiology, 2002, v. 225 n. 3, p. 663-672 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractPurpose: To evaluate clinical relevance of high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) findings in patients with bronchiectasis by using a quantitative high-resolution CT protocol to assess extent of bronchiectasis, severity of bronchial wall thickening, and presence of small-airway abnormalities and mosaic pattern. Materials and methods: Sixty Chinese patients with steady-state bronchiectasis underwent thoracic high-resolution CT and lung function tests. Exacerbation frequency per year and 24-hour sputum volume were determined. Extent of bronchiectasis, severity of bronchial wall thickening, and presence of small-airway abnormalities and mosaic attenuation were evaluated in each lobe, including the lingula. Differences between sex and smoking status with respect to high-resolution CT, lung function, and clinical parameters were tested with either the independent sample t test or the Mann-Whitney test. Spearman rank correlation was used to evaluate associations between clinical, lung function, and high-resolution CT scores. Multiple regression analyses were performed to determine which high-resolution CT parameters would best predict lung function and clinical parameters, adjusted for smoking. Results: Exacerbation frequency was associated with bronchial wall thickening (r = 0.32, P = .03); 24-hour sputum volume with bronchial wall thickening and small-airway abnormalities (r = 0.30 and 0.39, respectively; P < .05); and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC), and midexpiratory phase of forced expiratory flow (FEF25%-75%) (r = -0.33, -0.29, and -0.32, respectively; P < .05). Extent of bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, and mosaic attenuation, respectively, were related to FEV1 (r = -0.43 to -0.60, P < .001), FEF25%-75% (r = -0.38 to -0.57, P < .001), FVC (r = -0.36 to -0.46, P < .01), and FEV1/FVC ratio (r = -0.31 to -0.49, P < .01). After multiple regression analysis, bronchial wall thickening remained a significant determinant of airflow obstruction, whereas small-airway abnormalities remained associated with 24-hour sputum volume. Women had milder disease than men but showed more high-resolution CT functional correlations. Conclusion: Findings of this study establish a link between morphologic highresolution CT parameters and clinical activity and emphasize the role of bronchial wall thickening in patients with bronchiectasis. © RSNA, 2002.
 
ISSN0033-8419
2012 Impact Factor: 6.339
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.836
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000179420800008
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorOoi, GC
 
dc.contributor.authorKhong, PL
 
dc.contributor.authorChanYeung, M
 
dc.contributor.authorHo, JCM
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, PKS
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, JCK
 
dc.contributor.authorLam, WK
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, KWT
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:13:38Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:13:38Z
 
dc.date.issued2002
 
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To evaluate clinical relevance of high-resolution computed tomographic (CT) findings in patients with bronchiectasis by using a quantitative high-resolution CT protocol to assess extent of bronchiectasis, severity of bronchial wall thickening, and presence of small-airway abnormalities and mosaic pattern. Materials and methods: Sixty Chinese patients with steady-state bronchiectasis underwent thoracic high-resolution CT and lung function tests. Exacerbation frequency per year and 24-hour sputum volume were determined. Extent of bronchiectasis, severity of bronchial wall thickening, and presence of small-airway abnormalities and mosaic attenuation were evaluated in each lobe, including the lingula. Differences between sex and smoking status with respect to high-resolution CT, lung function, and clinical parameters were tested with either the independent sample t test or the Mann-Whitney test. Spearman rank correlation was used to evaluate associations between clinical, lung function, and high-resolution CT scores. Multiple regression analyses were performed to determine which high-resolution CT parameters would best predict lung function and clinical parameters, adjusted for smoking. Results: Exacerbation frequency was associated with bronchial wall thickening (r = 0.32, P = .03); 24-hour sputum volume with bronchial wall thickening and small-airway abnormalities (r = 0.30 and 0.39, respectively; P < .05); and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC), and midexpiratory phase of forced expiratory flow (FEF25%-75%) (r = -0.33, -0.29, and -0.32, respectively; P < .05). Extent of bronchiectasis, bronchial wall thickening, and mosaic attenuation, respectively, were related to FEV1 (r = -0.43 to -0.60, P < .001), FEF25%-75% (r = -0.38 to -0.57, P < .001), FVC (r = -0.36 to -0.46, P < .01), and FEV1/FVC ratio (r = -0.31 to -0.49, P < .01). After multiple regression analysis, bronchial wall thickening remained a significant determinant of airflow obstruction, whereas small-airway abnormalities remained associated with 24-hour sputum volume. Women had milder disease than men but showed more high-resolution CT functional correlations. Conclusion: Findings of this study establish a link between morphologic highresolution CT parameters and clinical activity and emphasize the role of bronchial wall thickening in patients with bronchiectasis. © RSNA, 2002.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationRadiology, 2002, v. 225 n. 3, p. 663-672 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage672
 
dc.identifier.hkuros80970
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179420800008
 
dc.identifier.issn0033-8419
2012 Impact Factor: 6.339
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.836
 
dc.identifier.issue3
 
dc.identifier.pmid12461244
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036892738
 
dc.identifier.spage663
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150875
 
dc.identifier.volume225
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherRadiological Society of North America, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://radiology.rsnajnls.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofRadiology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshBronchiectasis - Radiography
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshLung - Radiography
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
 
dc.subject.meshObserver Variation
 
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysis
 
dc.subject.meshRespiratory Function Tests
 
dc.subject.meshSex Factors
 
dc.subject.meshSmoking - Epidemiology
 
dc.subject.meshSputum
 
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed - Methods
 
dc.subjectBronchiectasis
 
dc.subjectLung, CT
 
dc.titleHigh-resolution CT quantification of bronchiectasis: Clinical and functional correlation
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Chan, PKS</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lee, JCK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Lam, WK</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Tsang, KWT</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong