File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Microsomal glutathione S-transferase gene polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk in a Han Chinese population

TitleMicrosomal glutathione S-transferase gene polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk in a Han Chinese population
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00384/index.htm
Citation
International Journal Of Colorectal Disease, 2007, v. 22 n. 10, p. 1185-1194 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and aims: Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are phase II detoxification enzymes. Human GSTs have been classified into cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal families. Several studies reported the association of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk with the genetic polymorphisms of cytosolic GSTs. The microsomal GSTs are structurally distinct but functionally similar to cytosolic GSTs; their association with CRC has not been reported. In this report, we summarized the result of a case-control study aimed at investigating the association of MGST1 gene locus polymorphisms with CRC risk among Han Chinese. Patient/methods: Three hundred and seventy-two healthy controls and 238 sporadic CRC patients participated in this study. DNA resequencing was conducted for the 3.4 kb genomic DNA region containing the promoter, exons, exon-intron junctions, and the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions. Results: We detected 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)including four novel SNPs not reported in database/literature. The gene shows a much higher nucleotide diversity than most human genes. The linkage and recombination analysis revealed 24 common haplotypes (13%≥freq≥1%) and identified extensive intragenic recombination throughout the MGST1 locus (R = 81.8). Significant CRC association (P < = 0.005) was not detected for each individual SNP. However, SNPs 102G>A and 16416G>A reached a marginal level of statistical significance with P values of 0.016 and 0.078, respectively. A combined genotype analysis detected a statistically significant CRC association for individuals carrying 102G>A/16416G>A (GG/GG) genotype (adjusted OR, 1.682; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.177-2.404; P = 0.004). Consistent with the results of genotype analysis, the GG haplotype (102G>A/16416G>A) with two risk alleles was associated with a significantly higher CRC risk comparing with the haplotypes with one or no risk allele (adjusted OR 1.744; 95% CI 1.309-2.322; P = 0.0001). Conclusion: The results suggest that MGST1 polymorphisms may contribute to CRC risk among Han Chinese. © Springer-Verlag 2007.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150810
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.383
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.102
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiao, LHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLai, AKCen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, JHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, XQen_US
dc.contributor.authorWei, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorCai, JHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLung, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorTai, SSWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:11:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:11:00Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Colorectal Disease, 2007, v. 22 n. 10, p. 1185-1194en_US
dc.identifier.issn0179-1958en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150810-
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims: Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are phase II detoxification enzymes. Human GSTs have been classified into cytosolic, mitochondrial, and microsomal families. Several studies reported the association of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk with the genetic polymorphisms of cytosolic GSTs. The microsomal GSTs are structurally distinct but functionally similar to cytosolic GSTs; their association with CRC has not been reported. In this report, we summarized the result of a case-control study aimed at investigating the association of MGST1 gene locus polymorphisms with CRC risk among Han Chinese. Patient/methods: Three hundred and seventy-two healthy controls and 238 sporadic CRC patients participated in this study. DNA resequencing was conducted for the 3.4 kb genomic DNA region containing the promoter, exons, exon-intron junctions, and the 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions. Results: We detected 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)including four novel SNPs not reported in database/literature. The gene shows a much higher nucleotide diversity than most human genes. The linkage and recombination analysis revealed 24 common haplotypes (13%≥freq≥1%) and identified extensive intragenic recombination throughout the MGST1 locus (R = 81.8). Significant CRC association (P < = 0.005) was not detected for each individual SNP. However, SNPs 102G>A and 16416G>A reached a marginal level of statistical significance with P values of 0.016 and 0.078, respectively. A combined genotype analysis detected a statistically significant CRC association for individuals carrying 102G>A/16416G>A (GG/GG) genotype (adjusted OR, 1.682; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.177-2.404; P = 0.004). Consistent with the results of genotype analysis, the GG haplotype (102G>A/16416G>A) with two risk alleles was associated with a significantly higher CRC risk comparing with the haplotypes with one or no risk allele (adjusted OR 1.744; 95% CI 1.309-2.322; P = 0.0001). Conclusion: The results suggest that MGST1 polymorphisms may contribute to CRC risk among Han Chinese. © Springer-Verlag 2007.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00384/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Colorectal Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBase Sequenceen_US
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms - Enzymology - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDnaen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Expression Regulationen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition To Diseaseen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshGlutathione Transferase - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMicrosomes - Enzymologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Single Nucleotide - Geneticsen_US
dc.titleMicrosomal glutathione S-transferase gene polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk in a Han Chinese populationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLung, ML:mlilung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLung, ML=rp00300en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00384-007-0308-9en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17483957-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34548154987en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34548154987&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1185en_US
dc.identifier.epage1194en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000248864300005-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, H=7409195750en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiao, LH=16175550800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, SM=35080774100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, KW=35080643000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, AKC=16175547000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, JH=15051213900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Q=35304190700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, XQ=16201729100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, W=35475294600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, H=26643423200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCai, JH=35080079300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLung, ML=7006411788en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTai, SSW=55197034800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, M=8646305800en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike2044768-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats