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Article: Expression of the zinc finger gene EVI-1 in ovarian and other cancers

TitleExpression of the zinc finger gene EVI-1 in ovarian and other cancers
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/bjc
Citation
British Journal Of Cancer, 1996, v. 74 n. 10, p. 1518-1525 How to Cite?
AbstractThe EVI-1 gene was originally detected as an ectopic viral insertion site and encodes a nuclear zinc finger DNA-binding protein. Previous studies showed restricted EVI-1 RNA or protein expression during ontogeny; in a kidney and an edometrial carcinoma cell line; and in normal murine oocytes and kidney cells. EVI-1 expression was also detected in a subset of acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs) and myelodysplasia. Because EVI-1 is expressed in the urogenital tract during development, we examined ovarian cancers and normal ovaries for EVI-1 RNA expression using reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNAase protection. Chromosome abnormalities were examined using karyotypes and whole chromosome 3 and 3q26 fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). RNA from six primary ovarian tumours, five normal ovaries and 47 tumour cell lines (25 ovarian, seven melanoma, three prostate, seven breast and one each of bladder, endometrial, lung, epidermoid and histiocytic lymphoma) was studied. Five of six primary ovarian tumours, three of five normal ovaries and 22 of 25 ovarian cell lines expressed EVI-1 RNA. A variety of other non-haematological cancers also expressed EVI-1 RNA. Immunostaining of ovarian cancer cell lines revealed nuclear EVI-1 protein. In contrast, normal ovary stained primarily within oocytes and faintly in stroma. Primary ovarian tumour showed nuclear and intense, diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Quantitation of EVI-1 RNA, performed using RNAase protection, showed ovarian carcinoma cells expressed 0 to 40 times the EVI-1 RNA in normal ovary, and 0-6 times the levels in leukaemia cell lines. Southern analyses of ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no amplification or rearrangements involving EVI-1. In some acute leukaemias, activation of EVI-1 transcription is associated with quadruplication 3(q24q27), but no other clonal structural rearrangements involving 3q26. However, whole chromsome 3 and 3q26 FISH performed on lines with high EVI-1 expression showed translocations involving chromosome 3q26. EVI-1 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovaries, suggesting a role for EVI-1 in solid tumour carcinogenesis or progression. Mechanisms underlying EVI-1 overexpression remain unclear, but may include rearrangements involving chromosome 3q26.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150786
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.569
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.939
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, DJen_US
dc.contributor.authorWoodward, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorThompson, FHen_US
dc.contributor.authorDos Santos, Ben_US
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, XYen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrent, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlberts, DSen_US
dc.contributor.authorTaetle, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:10:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:10:29Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Cancer, 1996, v. 74 n. 10, p. 1518-1525en_US
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150786-
dc.description.abstractThe EVI-1 gene was originally detected as an ectopic viral insertion site and encodes a nuclear zinc finger DNA-binding protein. Previous studies showed restricted EVI-1 RNA or protein expression during ontogeny; in a kidney and an edometrial carcinoma cell line; and in normal murine oocytes and kidney cells. EVI-1 expression was also detected in a subset of acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs) and myelodysplasia. Because EVI-1 is expressed in the urogenital tract during development, we examined ovarian cancers and normal ovaries for EVI-1 RNA expression using reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNAase protection. Chromosome abnormalities were examined using karyotypes and whole chromosome 3 and 3q26 fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). RNA from six primary ovarian tumours, five normal ovaries and 47 tumour cell lines (25 ovarian, seven melanoma, three prostate, seven breast and one each of bladder, endometrial, lung, epidermoid and histiocytic lymphoma) was studied. Five of six primary ovarian tumours, three of five normal ovaries and 22 of 25 ovarian cell lines expressed EVI-1 RNA. A variety of other non-haematological cancers also expressed EVI-1 RNA. Immunostaining of ovarian cancer cell lines revealed nuclear EVI-1 protein. In contrast, normal ovary stained primarily within oocytes and faintly in stroma. Primary ovarian tumour showed nuclear and intense, diffuse cytoplasmic staining. Quantitation of EVI-1 RNA, performed using RNAase protection, showed ovarian carcinoma cells expressed 0 to 40 times the EVI-1 RNA in normal ovary, and 0-6 times the levels in leukaemia cell lines. Southern analyses of ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no amplification or rearrangements involving EVI-1. In some acute leukaemias, activation of EVI-1 transcription is associated with quadruplication 3(q24q27), but no other clonal structural rearrangements involving 3q26. However, whole chromsome 3 and 3q26 FISH performed on lines with high EVI-1 expression showed translocations involving chromosome 3q26. EVI-1 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer compared with normal ovaries, suggesting a role for EVI-1 in solid tumour carcinogenesis or progression. Mechanisms underlying EVI-1 overexpression remain unclear, but may include rearrangements involving chromosome 3q26.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/bjcen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Canceren_US
dc.subject.meshBlotting, Southernen_US
dc.subject.meshDna-Binding Proteins - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Progressionen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGene Expressionen_US
dc.subject.meshGlyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshKaryotypingen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Proteins - Biosynthesis - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshOvarian Neoplasms - Genetics - Metabolism - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshProto-Oncogenesen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Neoplasm - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshTranscription Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTranscription, Geneticen_US
dc.subject.meshZinc Fingers - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleExpression of the zinc finger gene EVI-1 in ovarian and other cancersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGuan, XY:xyguan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, XY=rp00454en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid8932329-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-10544235446en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-10544235446&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume74en_US
dc.identifier.issue10en_US
dc.identifier.spage1518en_US
dc.identifier.epage1525en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996VR94700003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBrooks, DJ=7403483137en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoodward, S=55167037200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThompson, FH=7202217465en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDos Santos, B=7003452289en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRussell, M=7402974488en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, JM=12445064900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, XY=7201463221en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTrent, J=7201692482en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlberts, DS=35380854000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTaetle, R=7006711648en_US

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