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Article: Genetic Changes in Human Fetuses from Spontaneous Abortion after In Vitro Fertilization Detected by Comparative Genomic Hybridization

TitleGenetic Changes in Human Fetuses from Spontaneous Abortion after In Vitro Fertilization Detected by Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherSociety for the Study of Reproduction. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biolreprod.org/
Citation
Biology Of Reproduction, 2004, v. 70 n. 2, p. 495-499 How to Cite?
AbstractThe in vitro fertilization (IVF) technique is becoming a very important approach for infertile disease therapy, but approximately 30% of pregnancies are spontaneously aborted in the first trimester. It is believed that chromosomal abnormality is the major reason for early spontaneous abortion. Although some reports have mentioned cytogenetic changes in spontaneously aborted embryos after IVF, little is known about the comprehensive cytogenetic alterations in these aborted embryos. Here we use the comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) technique to analyze the genetic alterations in 41 spontaneously aborted human specimens after IVF. In this study, 25 of 41 cases (61%) showed chromosomal changes. Among them, autosomes and sex chromosomes were involved in 16 and 11 cases, respectively. Several nonrandom chromosomal changes were identified, including loss of one sex chromosome (six cases) and gains of 22 (four cases), Y (four cases), 21 (three cases), 4 (two cases), and 13 (two cases). Our data support the opinion that chromosome abnormality is one of the major causes of early spontaneous abortion after IVF. The association between chromosome changes in these spontaneously aborted fetuses and maternal age, infertility patterns, infertility causes, and IVF patterns (routine IVF and other methods, including intracytoplasmic sperm injection, egg donation, and embryo donation) were also studied. No significant correlation was found.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150785
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.471
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.646
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, YQen_US
dc.contributor.authorHu, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLin, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorSham, JSTen_US
dc.contributor.authorGong, Fen_US
dc.contributor.authorGuan, XYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Gen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:10:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:10:28Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationBiology Of Reproduction, 2004, v. 70 n. 2, p. 495-499en_US
dc.identifier.issn0006-3363en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150785-
dc.description.abstractThe in vitro fertilization (IVF) technique is becoming a very important approach for infertile disease therapy, but approximately 30% of pregnancies are spontaneously aborted in the first trimester. It is believed that chromosomal abnormality is the major reason for early spontaneous abortion. Although some reports have mentioned cytogenetic changes in spontaneously aborted embryos after IVF, little is known about the comprehensive cytogenetic alterations in these aborted embryos. Here we use the comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) technique to analyze the genetic alterations in 41 spontaneously aborted human specimens after IVF. In this study, 25 of 41 cases (61%) showed chromosomal changes. Among them, autosomes and sex chromosomes were involved in 16 and 11 cases, respectively. Several nonrandom chromosomal changes were identified, including loss of one sex chromosome (six cases) and gains of 22 (four cases), Y (four cases), 21 (three cases), 4 (two cases), and 13 (two cases). Our data support the opinion that chromosome abnormality is one of the major causes of early spontaneous abortion after IVF. The association between chromosome changes in these spontaneously aborted fetuses and maternal age, infertility patterns, infertility causes, and IVF patterns (routine IVF and other methods, including intracytoplasmic sperm injection, egg donation, and embryo donation) were also studied. No significant correlation was found.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSociety for the Study of Reproduction. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biolreprod.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBiology of Reproductionen_US
dc.subject.meshAbortion, Spontaneousen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshChromosome Aberrationsen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFertilization In Vitroen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfertility, Femaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMaternal Ageen_US
dc.subject.meshNucleic Acid Hybridization - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancy Trimester, Firsten_US
dc.subject.meshPregnancy, High-Risken_US
dc.titleGenetic Changes in Human Fetuses from Spontaneous Abortion after In Vitro Fertilization Detected by Comparative Genomic Hybridizationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGuan, XY:xyguan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, XY=rp00454en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1095/biolreprod.103.022343en_US
dc.identifier.pmid14561642-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0742288906en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros96136-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0742288906&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume70en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage495en_US
dc.identifier.epage499en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000188395400032-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, YQ=7402139346en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHu, L=34770075600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLin, G=35324763700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, JST=7101655565en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGong, F=7007086221en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, XY=7201463221en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, G=7403460237en_US

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