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Article: Genomic instability and alterations in Apc, Mcc and Dcc in Hong Kong patients with colorectal carcinoma

TitleGenomic instability and alterations in Apc, Mcc and Dcc in Hong Kong patients with colorectal carcinoma
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/29331/home
Citation
International Journal Of Cancer, 1999, v. 84 n. 4, p. 404-409 How to Cite?
AbstractOur aim was to reveal the significance of tumor-suppressor genes and genomic instability in 99 Hong Kong Chinese colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients by PCR-LOH analysis and PCR-PTT assay. The frequencies of allelic loss of Apc, Mcc and Dcc and of APC truncation were 31.3% (15/48), 11.6% (5/43), 44.4% (20/45) and 46/93 (49.5%), respectively. The frequency of Apc LOH was similar to, the Mcc LOH was lower than, and the Dcc LOH was higher than that reported for Caucasians and Japanese. In Hong Kong CRC patients, the replication error-positive (RER+) phenotype occurred with a frequency of 10% (10/99), which was similar to other results using microsatellite markers where RER+ frequencies ranged from 11% to 28%. The rates of genetic alteration in RER+ tumors were lower in tumors harboring p53, Mcc and Dcc alterations; similar in Apc; and higher in Ki-ras tumors compared with RER- tumors, though these differences did not achieve statistical significance. None of the biomarkers examined were predictive of survival independently, but strong trends confirming earlier observations of associations between RER+ phenotypes with proximal tumor location and poorly differentiated tumor status were noted. The RER+ phenotype was correlated significantly to the less aggressive Duke's stage B and improved prognosis. Additionally, tumors with RER+ phenotypes were positively correlated with young age and sex. Our results support the observation that a subset of younger male CRC patients in Hong Kong may develop CRC via the RER pathway and show differences in RER status and sex. A significantly higher percentage of older Hong Kong Chinese CRC patients had APC truncations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150744
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.531
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.657
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKo, JMYen_US
dc.contributor.authorCheung, MHYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKwan, MWen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, KWen_US
dc.contributor.authorTang, CMCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLung, MLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:09:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:09:40Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Cancer, 1999, v. 84 n. 4, p. 404-409en_US
dc.identifier.issn0020-7136en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150744-
dc.description.abstractOur aim was to reveal the significance of tumor-suppressor genes and genomic instability in 99 Hong Kong Chinese colorectal carcinoma (CRC) patients by PCR-LOH analysis and PCR-PTT assay. The frequencies of allelic loss of Apc, Mcc and Dcc and of APC truncation were 31.3% (15/48), 11.6% (5/43), 44.4% (20/45) and 46/93 (49.5%), respectively. The frequency of Apc LOH was similar to, the Mcc LOH was lower than, and the Dcc LOH was higher than that reported for Caucasians and Japanese. In Hong Kong CRC patients, the replication error-positive (RER+) phenotype occurred with a frequency of 10% (10/99), which was similar to other results using microsatellite markers where RER+ frequencies ranged from 11% to 28%. The rates of genetic alteration in RER+ tumors were lower in tumors harboring p53, Mcc and Dcc alterations; similar in Apc; and higher in Ki-ras tumors compared with RER- tumors, though these differences did not achieve statistical significance. None of the biomarkers examined were predictive of survival independently, but strong trends confirming earlier observations of associations between RER+ phenotypes with proximal tumor location and poorly differentiated tumor status were noted. The RER+ phenotype was correlated significantly to the less aggressive Duke's stage B and improved prognosis. Additionally, tumors with RER+ phenotypes were positively correlated with young age and sex. Our results support the observation that a subset of younger male CRC patients in Hong Kong may develop CRC via the RER pathway and show differences in RER status and sex. A significantly higher percentage of older Hong Kong Chinese CRC patients had APC truncations.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/29331/homeen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Canceren_US
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma - Drug Therapy - Genetics - Mortality - Pathology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 And Overen_US
dc.subject.meshAsian Continental Ancestry Group - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshChemotherapy, Adjuvanten_US
dc.subject.meshChina - Ethnologyen_US
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms - Drug Therapy - Genetics - Mortality - Pathology - Surgeryen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Replicationen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease-Free Survivalen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Apcen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Dccen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Mccen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Rasen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLoss Of Heterozygosityen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshMutationen_US
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Stagingen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reaction - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Deletionen_US
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rateen_US
dc.titleGenomic instability and alterations in Apc, Mcc and Dcc in Hong Kong patients with colorectal carcinomaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLung, ML:mlilung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLung, ML=rp00300en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/(SICI)1097-0215(19990820)84:4<404::AID-IJC13>3.0.CO;2-Len_US
dc.identifier.pmid10404094-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032805226en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032805226&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume84en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage404en_US
dc.identifier.epage409en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000081532000013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKo, JMY=35725559400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, MHY=37044558100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwan, MW=36860235000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CM=36631368800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, KW=35080643000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CMC=8274797200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLung, ML=7006411788en_US

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