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Article: Direct identification of serotypes of natural human rotavirus isolates by hybridization using cDNA probes derived from segment 9 of the rotavirus genome

TitleDirect identification of serotypes of natural human rotavirus isolates by hybridization using cDNA probes derived from segment 9 of the rotavirus genome
Authors
Issue Date1989
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Microbiology, 1989, v. 27 n. 3, p. 552-557 How to Cite?
AbstractUnder stringent hybridization conditions, cDNA of segment 9 of the rotavirus genome, which codes for the viral protein VP7, permitted differentiation of serotypes of culture-grown rotaviruses and natural isolates of human rotaviruses directly from clinical specimens. This was evident for the following reasons. (i) The cDNA of one serotype selectively hybridized with the RNA of the same serotype of culture-grown rotaviruses. (ii) Natural isolates of the virus thus identified as serotype 2 were also those which gave the short electrophoretic pattern characteristic of the genome of serotype 2, subgroup 1 viruses. Isolates having the long electrophoretic pattern characteristic of the genome of subgroup 2 viruses were identified as serotype 1, 3, or 4 by this method. (iii) For patients who had previously undergone serological analysis, the serotypes being excreted were the same serotypes against which there was the most marked serum neutralizing antibody response. Although the virus population was genetically diverse, the preponderance of the population prevalent in Guangzhou and Foshan in each of the three successive years between 1982 and 1985 comprised a single serotype. The dominant serotype changed from one year to another, but there was minimal cocirculation of different serotypes in this community. All virus isolates belonged to serotype 1, 2, 3, or 4, and there was no evidence to suggest that the other human rotavirus serotypes were prevalent in this community.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150689
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.151
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZheng, BJen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, WPen_US
dc.contributor.authorYan, YKen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, SKFen_US
dc.contributor.authorLung, MLen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, MHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:08:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:08:50Z-
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 1989, v. 27 n. 3, p. 552-557en_US
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150689-
dc.description.abstractUnder stringent hybridization conditions, cDNA of segment 9 of the rotavirus genome, which codes for the viral protein VP7, permitted differentiation of serotypes of culture-grown rotaviruses and natural isolates of human rotaviruses directly from clinical specimens. This was evident for the following reasons. (i) The cDNA of one serotype selectively hybridized with the RNA of the same serotype of culture-grown rotaviruses. (ii) Natural isolates of the virus thus identified as serotype 2 were also those which gave the short electrophoretic pattern characteristic of the genome of serotype 2, subgroup 1 viruses. Isolates having the long electrophoretic pattern characteristic of the genome of subgroup 2 viruses were identified as serotype 1, 3, or 4 by this method. (iii) For patients who had previously undergone serological analysis, the serotypes being excreted were the same serotypes against which there was the most marked serum neutralizing antibody response. Although the virus population was genetically diverse, the preponderance of the population prevalent in Guangzhou and Foshan in each of the three successive years between 1982 and 1985 comprised a single serotype. The dominant serotype changed from one year to another, but there was minimal cocirculation of different serotypes in this community. All virus isolates belonged to serotype 1, 2, 3, or 4, and there was no evidence to suggest that the other human rotavirus serotypes were prevalent in this community.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Viralen_US
dc.subject.meshCapsid - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshCapsid Proteinsen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshChinaen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Probesen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Viral - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshElectrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gelen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Viralen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshNucleic Acid Hybridizationen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Viral - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshRotavirus - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshRotavirus Infections - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_US
dc.subject.meshSerotypingen_US
dc.titleDirect identification of serotypes of natural human rotavirus isolates by hybridization using cDNA probes derived from segment 9 of the rotavirus genomeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLung, ML:mlilung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLung, ML=rp00300en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid2541169-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0024514333en_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage552en_US
dc.identifier.epage557en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1989T301700032-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZheng, BJ=7201781373en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, WP=7203021904en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan, YK=7404586434en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, SKF=7401542391en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLung, ML=7006411788en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, MH=7202076421en_US

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