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Article: Escherichia coli associated with childhood diarrheas

TitleEscherichia coli associated with childhood diarrheas
Authors
Issue Date1987
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Microbiology, 1987, v. 25 n. 11, p. 2145-2149 How to Cite?
AbstractWe studied 2,246 episodes of childhood diarrhea over a 2-year period in a general hospital serving a population of about one million on the island of Hong Kong. Rotavirus (24%) and nontyphoid salmonellas (23%) were the most common causal agents, followed by Campylobacter sp. (9%). Rotavirus occurred largely during winter, whereas salmonellas and Campylobacter sp. occurred more commonly during summer and autumn, respectively. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was rarely isolated (1%), and the isolates were clonally diverse. A small percentage (2.8%) of E. coli had serological specificities commonly associated with enteropathogenic E. coli, but only two of the isolates were also positive for HEp-2 adhesive factor. Pure or heavy and predominant growth of E. coli was obtained in repeated stool cultures of 432 (19%) of these episodes, which did not yield any of the above-mentioned pathogens. Although associated with diarrhea, these E. coli isolates possess neither the pathogenic attributes of enterotoxigenic E. coli nor the properties commonly associated with enteropathogenic E. coli. Enteroinvasive E. coli and enterohemorrhagic E. coli were considered unlikely causes on clinical grounds.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150684
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.631
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.151
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYam, WCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLung, MLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, JSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, MHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:08:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:08:40Z-
dc.date.issued1987en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Microbiology, 1987, v. 25 n. 11, p. 2145-2149en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0095-1137en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150684-
dc.description.abstractWe studied 2,246 episodes of childhood diarrhea over a 2-year period in a general hospital serving a population of about one million on the island of Hong Kong. Rotavirus (24%) and nontyphoid salmonellas (23%) were the most common causal agents, followed by Campylobacter sp. (9%). Rotavirus occurred largely during winter, whereas salmonellas and Campylobacter sp. occurred more commonly during summer and autumn, respectively. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli was rarely isolated (1%), and the isolates were clonally diverse. A small percentage (2.8%) of E. coli had serological specificities commonly associated with enteropathogenic E. coli, but only two of the isolates were also positive for HEp-2 adhesive factor. Pure or heavy and predominant growth of E. coli was obtained in repeated stool cultures of 432 (19%) of these episodes, which did not yield any of the above-mentioned pathogens. Although associated with diarrhea, these E. coli isolates possess neither the pathogenic attributes of enterotoxigenic E. coli nor the properties commonly associated with enteropathogenic E. coli. Enteroinvasive E. coli and enterohemorrhagic E. coli were considered unlikely causes on clinical grounds.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCampylobacter Infections - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDiarrhea, Infantile - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen_US
dc.subject.meshEnterotoxins - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli - Classification - Genetics - Pathogenicityen_US
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli Infections - Epidemiology - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshGenes, Bacterialen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfanten_US
dc.subject.meshPlasmidsen_US
dc.subject.meshRotavirus Infections - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSalmonella Infections - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_US
dc.titleEscherichia coli associated with childhood diarrheasen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYam, WC:wcyam@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLung, ML:mlilung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYam, WC=rp00313en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLung, ML=rp00300en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid3320082-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0023617733en_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2145en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2149en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1987K505800024-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYam, WC=7004281720en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLung, ML=7006411788en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, CY=7201354144en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, JS=24788939600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, MH=7202076421en_HK

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