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Article: Urbanization eases water crisis in China
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TitleUrbanization eases water crisis in China
 
AuthorsWu, Y1
Liu, S1 2
Chen, J3
 
KeywordsHuman activities
Migration
Water use
 
Issue Date2012
 
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.elsevier.com/environmental-development/
 
CitationEnvironmental Development, 2012, v. 2 n. 1, p. 142-144 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envdev.2012.02.003
 
AbstractSocioeconomic development in China has resulted in rapid urbanization, which includes a large amount of people making the transition from rural areas to cities. Many have speculated that this mass migration may have worsened the water crisis in many parts of the country. However, this study shows that the water crisis would be more severe if the rural-to-urban migration did not occur. © 2012.
 
ISSN2211-4645
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.112
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envdev.2012.02.003
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWu, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, S
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, J
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:06:39Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:06:39Z
 
dc.date.issued2012
 
dc.description.abstractSocioeconomic development in China has resulted in rapid urbanization, which includes a large amount of people making the transition from rural areas to cities. Many have speculated that this mass migration may have worsened the water crisis in many parts of the country. However, this study shows that the water crisis would be more severe if the rural-to-urban migration did not occur. © 2012.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Development, 2012, v. 2 n. 1, p. 142-144 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envdev.2012.02.003
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envdev.2012.02.003
 
dc.identifier.epage144
 
dc.identifier.hkuros207939
 
dc.identifier.issn2211-4645
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.112
 
dc.identifier.issue1
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84860995145
 
dc.identifier.spage142
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150672
 
dc.identifier.volume2
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.journals.elsevier.com/environmental-development/
 
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands
 
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Development
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectHuman activities
 
dc.subjectMigration
 
dc.subjectWater use
 
dc.titleUrbanization eases water crisis in China
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science Center
  2. South Dakota State University
  3. The University of Hong Kong