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Article: Investigation of the role of biopolymer clusters in MBR membrane fouling using flash freezing and environmental scanning electron microscopy

TitleInvestigation of the role of biopolymer clusters in MBR membrane fouling using flash freezing and environmental scanning electron microscopy
Authors
KeywordsBiological wastewater treatment
Biopolymer clusters (BPCs)
Environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)
Flash freezing
Fouling layer
Membrane bioreactor (MBR)
Issue Date2011
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphere
Citation
Chemosphere, 2011, v. 85 n. 7, p. 1154-1159 How to Cite?
AbstractThe technique that employs flash freezing and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilised for detailed investigation of the fouling materials in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The method involves the flash freezing of a wet sample in liquid nitrogen for 10. s to preserve its structure for direct ESEM observation with a high image resolution. ESEM images show that the sludge cake formed by simple filtration of the MBR bulk sludge has a highly porous, sponge-like structure with a fairly low resistance. However, the fouling layer attached to the membrane surface contains a thin gel layer under the main body of the sponge-like sludge cake, which is similar to that formed by filtration of a dispersion of biopolymer clusters (BPCs). It is apparent that BPCs tend to accumulate on the membrane surface, and the gel layer is largely responsible for the high filtration resistance of the cake layer on the fouled membranes. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150619
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.698
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.536
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
URC
University of Hong Kong
University Grants Committee (UGC)SEG_HKU10
Research Grants Council (RGC) of the Hong Kong SAR GovernmentHKU7144/E07
HKU714811E
Funding Information:

This research was supported by URC funding from the University of Hong Kong, Special Equipment Grant SEG_HKU10 from the University Grants Committee (UGC), and Grants HKU7144/E07 and HKU714811E from the Research Grants Council (RGC) of the Hong Kong SAR Government. The technical assistance of Mr. Keith C. H. Wong is greatly appreciated.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, XMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSun, FYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLi, XYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:06:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:06:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_HK
dc.identifier.citationChemosphere, 2011, v. 85 n. 7, p. 1154-1159en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0045-6535en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150619-
dc.description.abstractThe technique that employs flash freezing and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilised for detailed investigation of the fouling materials in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). The method involves the flash freezing of a wet sample in liquid nitrogen for 10. s to preserve its structure for direct ESEM observation with a high image resolution. ESEM images show that the sludge cake formed by simple filtration of the MBR bulk sludge has a highly porous, sponge-like structure with a fairly low resistance. However, the fouling layer attached to the membrane surface contains a thin gel layer under the main body of the sponge-like sludge cake, which is similar to that formed by filtration of a dispersion of biopolymer clusters (BPCs). It is apparent that BPCs tend to accumulate on the membrane surface, and the gel layer is largely responsible for the high filtration resistance of the cake layer on the fouled membranes. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphereen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofChemosphereen_HK
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Chemosphere. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Chemosphere, 2011, v. 85 n. 7, p. 1154-1159. DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.08.038-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectBiological wastewater treatmenten_HK
dc.subjectBiopolymer clusters (BPCs)en_HK
dc.subjectEnvironmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM)en_HK
dc.subjectFlash freezingen_HK
dc.subjectFouling layeren_HK
dc.subjectMembrane bioreactor (MBR)en_HK
dc.subject.meshBiopolymers - analysis-
dc.subject.meshBioreactors-
dc.subject.meshMembranes, Artificial-
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Electron, Scanning-
dc.subject.meshSewage - chemistry-
dc.titleInvestigation of the role of biopolymer clusters in MBR membrane fouling using flash freezing and environmental scanning electron microscopyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, XM: wangxm@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLi, XY: xlia@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, XM=rp01452en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLi, XY=rp00222en_HK
dc.description.naturepostprinten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chemosphere.2011.08.038en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid21924757-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80555122968en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros209076-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80555122968&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume85en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1154en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1159en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297965500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.relation.projectEnvironmental Bio-Nano Interface (EBNI) Characterization System-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, XM=23092524200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSun, FY=16064782300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, XY=26642887900en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike9832026-

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