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Article: Public participation in infrastructure and construction projects in China: from an EIA-based to a whole-cycle process

TitlePublic participation in infrastructure and construction projects in China: from an EIA-based to a whole-cycle process
Authors
KeywordsConstruction
Decision making
Environmental impact assessment
Infrastructural development
Life cycle analysis
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatint
Citation
Habitat International, 2012, v. 36 n. 1, p. 47-56 How to Cite?
AbstractMany governments world-wide are increasingly encouraging the involvement of interested individuals, groups and organisations in their public infrastructure and construction (PIC) projects as a means of improving the openness, transparency and accountability of the decision-making process and help improve the projects' long-term viability and benefits to the community. In China, however, the current participatory mechanism at the project level exists only as part of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) process. With an increasing demand for PIC projects and social equality in China, this suggests a need to bring the participatory process into line with international practice.The aim of this paper, therefore, is to identify the weaknesses of EIA-based public participation in China and the means by which it may be improved for the whole lifecycle of PIC schemes. To do this, the results of a series of interviews with a diverse group of experts is reported which analyse the nature and extent of existing problems of public participation in EIA and suggestions for improvement. These indicate that the current level of participation in PIC projects is quite limited, particularly in the crucial earlier stages, primarily due to traditional culture and values, uneven progress in the adoption of participatory mechanisms, the risk of not meeting targets and lack of confidence in public competence. Finally, a process flowchart is proposed to guide construction practitioners and the community in general. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150604
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.029
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.038
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, THYen_US
dc.contributor.authorNg, STen_US
dc.contributor.authorSkitmore, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:06:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:06:04Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationHabitat International, 2012, v. 36 n. 1, p. 47-56en_US
dc.identifier.issn0197-3975en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150604-
dc.description.abstractMany governments world-wide are increasingly encouraging the involvement of interested individuals, groups and organisations in their public infrastructure and construction (PIC) projects as a means of improving the openness, transparency and accountability of the decision-making process and help improve the projects' long-term viability and benefits to the community. In China, however, the current participatory mechanism at the project level exists only as part of the environmental impact assessment (EIA) process. With an increasing demand for PIC projects and social equality in China, this suggests a need to bring the participatory process into line with international practice.The aim of this paper, therefore, is to identify the weaknesses of EIA-based public participation in China and the means by which it may be improved for the whole lifecycle of PIC schemes. To do this, the results of a series of interviews with a diverse group of experts is reported which analyse the nature and extent of existing problems of public participation in EIA and suggestions for improvement. These indicate that the current level of participation in PIC projects is quite limited, particularly in the crucial earlier stages, primarily due to traditional culture and values, uneven progress in the adoption of participatory mechanisms, the risk of not meeting targets and lack of confidence in public competence. Finally, a process flowchart is proposed to guide construction practitioners and the community in general. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatinten_US
dc.relation.ispartofHabitat Internationalen_US
dc.subjectConstructionen_US
dc.subjectDecision makingen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental impact assessmenten_US
dc.subjectInfrastructural developmenten_US
dc.subjectLife cycle analysisen_US
dc.titlePublic participation in infrastructure and construction projects in China: from an EIA-based to a whole-cycle processen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLi, THY: hongyangli@yahoo.cnen_US
dc.identifier.emailNg, ST: tstng@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSkitmore, M: rm.skitmore@qut.edu.au-
dc.identifier.authorityThomas Ng, S=rp00158en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.habitatint.2011.05.006en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053443429en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros204744-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053443429&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage47en_US
dc.identifier.epage56en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000296954200006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSkitmore, M=7003387239en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas Ng, S=7403358853en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, THY=38861925000en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9494065-

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