File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria dominates over ammonia-oxidizing archaea in a saline nitrification reactor under low DO and high nitrogen loading

TitleAmmonia-oxidizing bacteria dominates over ammonia-oxidizing archaea in a saline nitrification reactor under low DO and high nitrogen loading
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/71002188
Citation
Biotechnology And Bioengineering, 2011, v. 108 n. 11, p. 2544-2552 How to Cite?
Abstract
A continuous nitrification reactor treating saline wastewater was operated for almost 1 year under low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.15-0.5mg/L) and high nitrogen loadings (0.26-0.52kg-N/(m 3day)) in four phases. The diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed by cloning, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results showed that there were only one dominant AOA species and one dominant AOB species in the reactor in all of the four experimental phases. The amoA gene of the dominant AOA only had a similarity of 89.3% with the cultured AOA species Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. All of the AOB species detected in the reactor belong to Nitrosomonas genus and it was found that the AOB populations changed with the ammonium loadings and DO levels. The abundance of AOB in the reactor was ∼40 times larger than that of AOA, and the ratio of AOB to AOA increased significantly up to ∼2,000 to ∼4,000 with the increase of ammonium loading, indicating that AOB are much more competitive than AOA in high ammonium environments and probably AOA play a less important role than AOB in the nitrification reactors. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150601
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 4.164
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong General Research Fund

References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYe, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:06:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:06:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationBiotechnology And Bioengineering, 2011, v. 108 n. 11, p. 2544-2552en_US
dc.identifier.issn0006-3592en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150601-
dc.description.abstractA continuous nitrification reactor treating saline wastewater was operated for almost 1 year under low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.15-0.5mg/L) and high nitrogen loadings (0.26-0.52kg-N/(m 3day)) in four phases. The diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed by cloning, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results showed that there were only one dominant AOA species and one dominant AOB species in the reactor in all of the four experimental phases. The amoA gene of the dominant AOA only had a similarity of 89.3% with the cultured AOA species Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. All of the AOB species detected in the reactor belong to Nitrosomonas genus and it was found that the AOB populations changed with the ammonium loadings and DO levels. The abundance of AOB in the reactor was ∼40 times larger than that of AOA, and the ratio of AOB to AOA increased significantly up to ∼2,000 to ∼4,000 with the increase of ammonium loading, indicating that AOB are much more competitive than AOA in high ammonium environments and probably AOA play a less important role than AOB in the nitrification reactors. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/71002188en_US
dc.relation.ispartofBiotechnology and Bioengineeringen_US
dc.subject.meshAmmonia - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshArchaea - Classification - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBacteria - Classification - Genetics - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBiodiversityen_US
dc.subject.meshBioreactors - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCulture Media - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Fingerprintingen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Archaeal - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshNitrificationen_US
dc.subject.meshNitrogen - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reductionen_US
dc.subject.meshOxygen - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Restriction Fragment Lengthen_US
dc.subject.meshReal-Time Polymerase Chain Reactionen_US
dc.subject.meshSalinityen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Dnaen_US
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleAmmonia-oxidizing bacteria dominates over ammonia-oxidizing archaea in a saline nitrification reactor under low DO and high nitrogen loadingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, T:zhangt@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, T=rp00211en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/bit.23211en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21618465en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053053871en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros208077-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053053871&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume108en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage2544en_US
dc.identifier.epage2552en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295717700004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYe, L=36451639300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, T=24470677400en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats