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Article: Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria dominates over ammonia-oxidizing archaea in a saline nitrification reactor under low DO and high nitrogen loading
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TitleAmmonia-oxidizing bacteria dominates over ammonia-oxidizing archaea in a saline nitrification reactor under low DO and high nitrogen loading
 
AuthorsYe, L1
Zhang, T1
 
Issue Date2011
 
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/71002188
 
CitationBiotechnology And Bioengineering, 2011, v. 108 n. 11, p. 2544-2552 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.23211
 
AbstractA continuous nitrification reactor treating saline wastewater was operated for almost 1 year under low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.15-0.5mg/L) and high nitrogen loadings (0.26-0.52kg-N/(m 3day)) in four phases. The diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed by cloning, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results showed that there were only one dominant AOA species and one dominant AOB species in the reactor in all of the four experimental phases. The amoA gene of the dominant AOA only had a similarity of 89.3% with the cultured AOA species Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. All of the AOB species detected in the reactor belong to Nitrosomonas genus and it was found that the AOB populations changed with the ammonium loadings and DO levels. The abundance of AOB in the reactor was ∼40 times larger than that of AOA, and the ratio of AOB to AOA increased significantly up to ∼2,000 to ∼4,000 with the increase of ammonium loading, indicating that AOB are much more competitive than AOA in high ammonium environments and probably AOA play a less important role than AOB in the nitrification reactors. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
ISSN0006-3592
2012 Impact Factor: 3.648
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.383
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.23211
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000295717700004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong General Research Fund

 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorYe, L
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, T
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:06:03Z
 
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:06:03Z
 
dc.date.issued2011
 
dc.description.abstractA continuous nitrification reactor treating saline wastewater was operated for almost 1 year under low dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.15-0.5mg/L) and high nitrogen loadings (0.26-0.52kg-N/(m 3day)) in four phases. The diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were analyzed by cloning, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The results showed that there were only one dominant AOA species and one dominant AOB species in the reactor in all of the four experimental phases. The amoA gene of the dominant AOA only had a similarity of 89.3% with the cultured AOA species Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1. All of the AOB species detected in the reactor belong to Nitrosomonas genus and it was found that the AOB populations changed with the ammonium loadings and DO levels. The abundance of AOB in the reactor was ∼40 times larger than that of AOA, and the ratio of AOB to AOA increased significantly up to ∼2,000 to ∼4,000 with the increase of ammonium loading, indicating that AOB are much more competitive than AOA in high ammonium environments and probably AOA play a less important role than AOB in the nitrification reactors. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBiotechnology And Bioengineering, 2011, v. 108 n. 11, p. 2544-2552 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.23211
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.23211
 
dc.identifier.epage2552
 
dc.identifier.hkuros208077
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295717700004
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
Funding Information:

Contract grant sponsor: Hong Kong General Research Fund

 
dc.identifier.issn0006-3592
2012 Impact Factor: 3.648
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.383
 
dc.identifier.issue11
 
dc.identifier.pmid21618465
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053053871
 
dc.identifier.spage2544
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150601
 
dc.identifier.volume108
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/71002188
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofBiotechnology and Bioengineering
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAmmonia - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshArchaea - Classification - Genetics - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshBacteria - Classification - Genetics - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshBiodiversity
 
dc.subject.meshBioreactors - Microbiology
 
dc.subject.meshCulture Media - Chemistry
 
dc.subject.meshDna Fingerprinting
 
dc.subject.meshDna, Archaeal - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial - Genetics
 
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Data
 
dc.subject.meshNitrification
 
dc.subject.meshNitrogen - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reduction
 
dc.subject.meshOxygen - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
 
dc.subject.meshReal-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
 
dc.subject.meshSalinity
 
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Dna
 
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiology
 
dc.titleAmmonia-oxidizing bacteria dominates over ammonia-oxidizing archaea in a saline nitrification reactor under low DO and high nitrogen loading
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong