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Article: Probing roles of lipopolysaccharide, type 1 fimbria, and colanic acid in the attachment of Escherichia coli strains on inert surfaces

TitleProbing roles of lipopolysaccharide, type 1 fimbria, and colanic acid in the attachment of Escherichia coli strains on inert surfaces
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/langmuir
Citation
Langmuir, 2011, v. 27 n. 18, p. 11545-11553 How to Cite?
AbstractThe roles of bacterial surface polymers in reversible (phase I) and irreversible (phase II) attachment (i.e., lipopolysaccharides (LPS), type 1 fimbria, and capsular colanic acid (CA)) were investigated in situ by combining fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the phase I attachment by counting the total number of cells on the substrata, and AFM was applied to image the phase II cells and measure the lateral detachment force to characterize phase II attachment. Also, by comparing the number of cells in phases I and II, the transformation ratio was calculated and used as an index to evaluate the roles of different polymers in the attachment process. Escherichia coli K-12 and its six mutants, which had different surface polymers in terms of LPS structures, CA contents, and type 1 fimbriae, were used as the test strains. Six different materials were applied as substrata, including glass, two metals (aluminum and stainless steel), and three plastics (polyvinyl chloride, polycarbonate, and polyethylene). The results indicated that LPS significantly enhanced phases I and II attachment as well as the transformation ratio from phase I to II. Like LPS, type 1 fimbriae largely increased the phase I attachment and the transformation ratio; however, they did not significantly influence the adhesion strength in phase II. CA had a negative effect on attachment in phases I and II by decreasing the adhered number of cells and the lateral detachment force, respectively, but had no influence on the transformation ratio. © 2011 American Chemical Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150599
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 4.457
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.645
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong UGCSEG HKU10
HKU
Funding Information:

We thank the Hong Kong UGC One-Off Special Equipment Grant Scheme (SEG HKU10) for the financial support on this study. Y.C. thanks the HKU for a postgraduate studentship. The technical assistance of Ms. Vicky Fung is greatly appreciated.

References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChao, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ten_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:06:02Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:06:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationLangmuir, 2011, v. 27 n. 18, p. 11545-11553en_US
dc.identifier.issn0743-7463en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150599-
dc.description.abstractThe roles of bacterial surface polymers in reversible (phase I) and irreversible (phase II) attachment (i.e., lipopolysaccharides (LPS), type 1 fimbria, and capsular colanic acid (CA)) were investigated in situ by combining fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the phase I attachment by counting the total number of cells on the substrata, and AFM was applied to image the phase II cells and measure the lateral detachment force to characterize phase II attachment. Also, by comparing the number of cells in phases I and II, the transformation ratio was calculated and used as an index to evaluate the roles of different polymers in the attachment process. Escherichia coli K-12 and its six mutants, which had different surface polymers in terms of LPS structures, CA contents, and type 1 fimbriae, were used as the test strains. Six different materials were applied as substrata, including glass, two metals (aluminum and stainless steel), and three plastics (polyvinyl chloride, polycarbonate, and polyethylene). The results indicated that LPS significantly enhanced phases I and II attachment as well as the transformation ratio from phase I to II. Like LPS, type 1 fimbriae largely increased the phase I attachment and the transformation ratio; however, they did not significantly influence the adhesion strength in phase II. CA had a negative effect on attachment in phases I and II by decreasing the adhered number of cells and the lateral detachment force, respectively, but had no influence on the transformation ratio. © 2011 American Chemical Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/langmuiren_US
dc.relation.ispartofLangmuiren_US
dc.subject.meshBacterial Adhesionen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Counten_US
dc.subject.meshEscherichia Coli K12 - Cytology - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshFimbriae Proteins - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshLipopolysaccharides - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Viabilityen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Atomic Forceen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopy, Fluorescenceen_US
dc.subject.meshPhysicochemical Processesen_US
dc.subject.meshPolysaccharides - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSurface Propertiesen_US
dc.titleProbing roles of lipopolysaccharide, type 1 fimbria, and colanic acid in the attachment of Escherichia coli strains on inert surfacesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, T:zhangt@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, T=rp00211en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/la202534pen_US
dc.identifier.pmid21842859en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052718478en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros208088-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052718478&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume27en_US
dc.identifier.issue18en_US
dc.identifier.spage11545en_US
dc.identifier.epage11553en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1520-5827-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000294790500035-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChao, Y=36503486900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, T=24470677400en_US

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