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Article: Institutional Compliance Framework and business continuity management in Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR and Singapore

TitleInstitutional Compliance Framework and business continuity management in Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR and Singapore
Authors
KeywordsBusiness Continuity
Construction Industry
Disasters
Regulation
Issue Date2010
PublisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/dpm.htm
Citation
Disaster Prevention And Management, 2010, v. 19 n. 5, p. 596-614 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: The business environment is fraught with risks and crises. Yet, in spite of the uncertainties faced, many construction companies were not aware of business continuity management (BCM), nor have they implemented BCM within their organizations. The purpose of this study is to understand the reasons behind this observation. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire survey was conducted with large construction companies in China, Hong Kong and Singapore to identify the threats and crises faced by these organizations. The survey findings were aggregated with a view to understanding why BCM is not widely implemented in construction companies. Findings: The survey findings were mapped against the Institutional Compliance Framework to explain the behavior of construction companies pertaining to BCM implementation. The study suggests that rational choice theory, normative theory and cultural-cognitive theory provide useful pointers to understanding the decisions made and the actions that should be taken to encourage more construction companies to adopt, develop and implement BCM in their organizations. Originality/value: Through a three-country survey, the study presents the threats and crises that construction companies have identified in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. More significantly, the study provides, for the first time, a theoretical underpinning to explain how construction companies may receive BCM and the measures that decision makers can take to encourage these organizations to pay more attention strategically to BCM in their operations. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150538
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.987
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.533
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLow, SPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, JYen_US
dc.contributor.authorKumaraswamy, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:05:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:05:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.citationDisaster Prevention And Management, 2010, v. 19 n. 5, p. 596-614en_US
dc.identifier.issn0965-3562en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150538-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The business environment is fraught with risks and crises. Yet, in spite of the uncertainties faced, many construction companies were not aware of business continuity management (BCM), nor have they implemented BCM within their organizations. The purpose of this study is to understand the reasons behind this observation. Design/methodology/approach: A questionnaire survey was conducted with large construction companies in China, Hong Kong and Singapore to identify the threats and crises faced by these organizations. The survey findings were aggregated with a view to understanding why BCM is not widely implemented in construction companies. Findings: The survey findings were mapped against the Institutional Compliance Framework to explain the behavior of construction companies pertaining to BCM implementation. The study suggests that rational choice theory, normative theory and cultural-cognitive theory provide useful pointers to understanding the decisions made and the actions that should be taken to encourage more construction companies to adopt, develop and implement BCM in their organizations. Originality/value: Through a three-country survey, the study presents the threats and crises that construction companies have identified in China, Hong Kong, and Singapore. More significantly, the study provides, for the first time, a theoretical underpinning to explain how construction companies may receive BCM and the measures that decision makers can take to encourage these organizations to pay more attention strategically to BCM in their operations. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.emeraldinsight.com/dpm.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofDisaster Prevention and Managementen_US
dc.subjectBusiness Continuityen_US
dc.subjectConstruction Industryen_US
dc.subjectDisastersen_US
dc.subjectRegulationen_US
dc.titleInstitutional Compliance Framework and business continuity management in Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR and Singaporeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKumaraswamy, M:mohan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKumaraswamy, M=rp00126en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/09653561011091922en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-78349231221en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros211790-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-78349231221&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage596en_US
dc.identifier.epage614en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000291129300008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, SP=7102636099en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, JY=35488200100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKumaraswamy, M=35566270600en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike8254153-

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