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Article: Occurrence of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in activated sludges of a laboratory scale reactor and two wastewater treatment plants

TitleOccurrence of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in activated sludges of a laboratory scale reactor and two wastewater treatment plants
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JAM
Citation
Journal of Applied Microbiology, 2009, v. 107 n. 3, p. 970-977 How to Cite?
Abstract
Aims: Characterization of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) community in activated sludge from a nitrogen removal bioreactor and wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Methods and Results: Three primer sets specific for ammonia mono-oxygenase α-subunit (amoA) were used to construct clone libraries for activated sludge sample from a nitrogen removal bioreactor. One primer set resulted in strong nonspecific PCR products. The other two clone libraries retrieved both shared and unique AOA amoA sequences. One primer set was chosen to study the AOA communities of activated sludge samples from Shatin and Stanley WWTPs. In total, 18 AOA amoA sequences were recovered and compared to the previous reported sequences. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that sequences found in this study fell into three clusters. Conclusions: Different primers resulted in varied AOA communities from the same sample. The AOA found from Hong Kong WWTPs were closely similar to those from sediment and soil, but distinct from those from activated sludge in other places. A comparison of clone libraries between Shatin WWTP and bioreactor indicated the AOA community significantly shifted only after 30-day enrichment. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study confirmed the occurrence of AOA in a laboratory scale nitrogen removal bioreactor and Hong Kong WWTPs treating saline or freshwater wastewater. AOA communities found in this study were significantly different from those found in other places. To retrieve diverse AOA communities from environmental samples, a combination of different primers for the amoA gene is needed. © 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150504
ISSN
2013 Impact Factor: 2.386
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Hong Kong General Research FundHKU7197/08E
Funding Information:

The authors wish to thank the Hong Kong General Research Fund (HKU7197/08E) for the financial support of this study, and Qingmei Yan and Meifei Shao wish to thank HKU for the postgraduate studentship.

References

 

Author Affiliations
  1. Stanford University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorJin, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorYan, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorShao, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWells, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorCriddle, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, HHPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:05:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:05:16Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Applied Microbiology, 2009, v. 107 n. 3, p. 970-977en_US
dc.identifier.issn1364-5072en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150504-
dc.description.abstractAims: Characterization of the ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) community in activated sludge from a nitrogen removal bioreactor and wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Methods and Results: Three primer sets specific for ammonia mono-oxygenase α-subunit (amoA) were used to construct clone libraries for activated sludge sample from a nitrogen removal bioreactor. One primer set resulted in strong nonspecific PCR products. The other two clone libraries retrieved both shared and unique AOA amoA sequences. One primer set was chosen to study the AOA communities of activated sludge samples from Shatin and Stanley WWTPs. In total, 18 AOA amoA sequences were recovered and compared to the previous reported sequences. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that sequences found in this study fell into three clusters. Conclusions: Different primers resulted in varied AOA communities from the same sample. The AOA found from Hong Kong WWTPs were closely similar to those from sediment and soil, but distinct from those from activated sludge in other places. A comparison of clone libraries between Shatin WWTP and bioreactor indicated the AOA community significantly shifted only after 30-day enrichment. Significance and Impact of the Study: This study confirmed the occurrence of AOA in a laboratory scale nitrogen removal bioreactor and Hong Kong WWTPs treating saline or freshwater wastewater. AOA communities found in this study were significantly different from those found in other places. To retrieve diverse AOA communities from environmental samples, a combination of different primers for the amoA gene is needed. © 2009 The Society for Applied Microbiology.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JAMen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAmmonia - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshArchaea - Enzymology - Genetics - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshArchaeal Proteins - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshBioreactors - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Primersen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Archaeal - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshGenetic Variationen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshOxidoreductases - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Dnaen_US
dc.subject.meshSewage - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshWaste Disposal, Fluiden_US
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleOccurrence of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea in activated sludges of a laboratory scale reactor and two wastewater treatment plantsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, T: zhangt@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailJin, T: honeybeeking@hotmail.comen_US
dc.identifier.emailFang, HHP: hrechef@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, T=rp00211en_US
dc.identifier.authorityFang, HHP=rp00115en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2672.2009.04283.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid19486399en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68849114735en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros175516-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68849114735&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume107en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage970en_US
dc.identifier.epage977en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000268854000028-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, T=24470677400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJin, T=46961330500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYan, Q=36055876900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShao, M=34868583400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWells, G=14069428800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCriddle, C=7004173112en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFang, HHP=7402542625en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5487556-

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