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Article: A numerical study of the influence of heterogeneity on the strength characterization of rock under uniaxial tension

TitleA numerical study of the influence of heterogeneity on the strength characterization of rock under uniaxial tension
Authors
KeywordsHeterogeneity
Numerical Modeling
Rock
Strength
Tension Failure
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mechmat
Citation
Mechanics Of Materials, 2007, v. 39 n. 4, p. 326-339 How to Cite?
AbstractThe behavior of a specimen under uniaxial tension and the process of micro-fracture in that specimen are phenomena of considerable interest in understanding the strength characterization of brittle or quasi-brittle materials such as rock. In this study, numerical results based on a Rock Failure Process Analysis code (RFPA2D) are presented. They show the nucleation and growth of macro-cracks in relatively homogeneous and heterogeneous specimens under uniaxial tension. Although the details of macro-crack formation vary from specimen to specimen, the numerical simulations consistently display a number of features. In relatively homogeneous specimens, the macro-crack nucleates abruptly at a point in the specimen soon after reaching the peak stress. Before macro-crack nucleation, acoustic emission (AE) events, or micro-fractures occur at locations that are randomly distributed throughout the specimen. It is very difficult to predict where the macro-crack will begin. The failed specimen has no residual strength. However, relatively heterogeneous specimens show a somewhat different response, with more randomly distributed AE events appearing in the early stage of loading. In contrast to the homogeneous specimens, macro-crack nucleation in heterogeneous specimens starts well before the peak stress is reached, and the crack propagation and coalescence can be traced, which can then be used to predict the macro-fracturing of the specimen. For specimens with the same heterogeneity, however, the numerical simulations show that the failure modes depend greatly on the crack initiation location, which is found to be sensitive to the local disorder features within the specimen. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150431
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.636
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.311
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, CAen_US
dc.contributor.authorTham, LGen_US
dc.contributor.authorWang, SHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, WHen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T06:04:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-26T06:04:44Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationMechanics Of Materials, 2007, v. 39 n. 4, p. 326-339en_US
dc.identifier.issn0167-6636en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/150431-
dc.description.abstractThe behavior of a specimen under uniaxial tension and the process of micro-fracture in that specimen are phenomena of considerable interest in understanding the strength characterization of brittle or quasi-brittle materials such as rock. In this study, numerical results based on a Rock Failure Process Analysis code (RFPA2D) are presented. They show the nucleation and growth of macro-cracks in relatively homogeneous and heterogeneous specimens under uniaxial tension. Although the details of macro-crack formation vary from specimen to specimen, the numerical simulations consistently display a number of features. In relatively homogeneous specimens, the macro-crack nucleates abruptly at a point in the specimen soon after reaching the peak stress. Before macro-crack nucleation, acoustic emission (AE) events, or micro-fractures occur at locations that are randomly distributed throughout the specimen. It is very difficult to predict where the macro-crack will begin. The failed specimen has no residual strength. However, relatively heterogeneous specimens show a somewhat different response, with more randomly distributed AE events appearing in the early stage of loading. In contrast to the homogeneous specimens, macro-crack nucleation in heterogeneous specimens starts well before the peak stress is reached, and the crack propagation and coalescence can be traced, which can then be used to predict the macro-fracturing of the specimen. For specimens with the same heterogeneity, however, the numerical simulations show that the failure modes depend greatly on the crack initiation location, which is found to be sensitive to the local disorder features within the specimen. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mechmaten_US
dc.relation.ispartofMechanics of Materialsen_US
dc.subjectHeterogeneityen_US
dc.subjectNumerical Modelingen_US
dc.subjectRocken_US
dc.subjectStrengthen_US
dc.subjectTension Failureen_US
dc.titleA numerical study of the influence of heterogeneity on the strength characterization of rock under uniaxial tensionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTham, LG:hrectlg@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTham, LG=rp00176en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mechmat.2006.05.006en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37849189170en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros212071-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-37849189170&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage326en_US
dc.identifier.epage339en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243641800004-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CA=7404394097en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTham, LG=7006213628en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, SH=15060709300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, H=8396192000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, WH=24348010700en_US

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